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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . ns we learn from the sculptures on Trajans column. Thecompanion of this man has transfixed a bull, which flies, 240 POMPEII. carrying with him the heavy lance with which he is wounded.He turns his head towards his assailant, and seems to wishto return to the attack; the man by his gestures appearsastonished, beholding himself disarmed and at the mercy ofthe animal, whom he thought mortally stric

. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . ns we learn from the sculptures on Trajans column. Thecompanion of this man has transfixed a bull, which flies, 240 POMPEII. carrying with him the heavy lance with which he is wounded.He turns his head towards his assailant, and seems to wishto return to the attack; the man by his gestures appearsastonished, beholding himself disarmed and at the mercy ofthe animal, whom he thought mortally stric Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CE321F

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7.2 MB (248 KB Compressed download)

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1454 x 1719 px | 24.6 x 29.1 cm | 9.7 x 11.5 inches | 150dpi

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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . ns we learn from the sculptures on Trajans column. Thecompanion of this man has transfixed a bull, which flies, 240 POMPEII. carrying with him the heavy lance with which he is wounded.He turns his head towards his assailant, and seems to wishto return to the attack; the man by his gestures appearsastonished, beholding himself disarmed and at the mercy ofthe animal, whom he thought mortally stricken. Pliny(lib. viii. cap. 45) speaks of the ferocity shown by bulls in thesecombats, and of having seen them, when stretched for deadon the arena, lift themselves up and renew the combat.The following cuts represent the helmets of two of thefigures at large, and the greaves, or boots.. Another sort of amphitheatrical amusements consisted inwitnessing the death of persons under sentence of the law, either by the hands of the executioner, or by being exposedto the fury of savage animals. The early Christians wereespecially subjected to this species of cruelty. Nero availedhimself of the prejudice against them to turn aside popularindignation after the great conflagration of Rome, which i? THE AMPHITHEATRE. 241 commonly ascribed to his own wanton love of mischief; andwe learn from TertuUian, that, after great public misfor-tunes, the cry of the populace was, To the lions with theChristians.* The Coliseum now owes its preservation tothe Christian blood so profusely shed within its walls.After serving during ages as a quarry of hewn stone for theuse of all whose station and power entitled them to a sharein public plunder, it was at last secured from further injuryby Pope Benedict XIV., who consecrated the building aboutthe middle of the last century, and placed it under t

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