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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . and a most tremendous pair ofmustachios, ever sedulously cherished by the eastern nations.In forming these caricatures, however, the artist had a graverend in view than either amusing men or frightening boys—that of guarding the drinker while in a helpless state ofintoxication from the malign influence of an evil eye or thewiles of enchantment; for among the ancients, who believeddevoutly in the

. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . and a most tremendous pair ofmustachios, ever sedulously cherished by the eastern nations.In forming these caricatures, however, the artist had a graverend in view than either amusing men or frightening boys—that of guarding the drinker while in a helpless state ofintoxication from the malign influence of an evil eye or thewiles of enchantment; for among the ancients, who believeddevoutly in the Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CDAWPA

File size:

7.1 MB (383.1 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1271 x 1965 px | 21.5 x 33.3 cm | 8.5 x 13.1 inches | 150dpi

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. Pompeii; its history, buildings and antiquities : an account of the destruction of the city, with a full description of the remains, and of the recent excavations and also an itinerary for visitors . and a most tremendous pair ofmustachios, ever sedulously cherished by the eastern nations.In forming these caricatures, however, the artist had a graverend in view than either amusing men or frightening boys—that of guarding the drinker while in a helpless state ofintoxication from the malign influence of an evil eye or thewiles of enchantment; for among the ancients, who believeddevoutly in the power of drugs and sorceries of all kinds, the salutary power of averting those evils was assigned to allsuch grotesque figures as we have here described. The learned seem to have been generally mistaken on thesubject of glass-making among the ancients, who appear to Sum figuli lusus Rufi persona BataviQuaj tu derides, hscc timet ora puer.- -Mart. 176. 558 POMPEII. have been far more skilful than had been imagined. Thevast collection of bottles, vases, glasses, and other utensils, discovered at Pompeii, is sufficient to show that the ancientswere well acquainted with the art of glass-blowing.. On the next page we have something like a wine-basket, made of clay, called ayyoOriKr]^ or kyyvoSrjKrj, by the Greeks, and incitega by the Romans, containing two glass vessels, ofthe kind called 6^v^a(f>ov, because, being narrow in the neck, the liquor came out drop by drop. DOMESTIC UTENSILS. 559 There is no doubt but that the Romans possessed glass insufficient plenty to apply it to purposes of household orna-ment. The raw material appears from Plinys account tohave undergone two fusions; the first converted it into a

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