Pictures from English literature . THE RIVALS. When Dr. Johnson proposed Richard Brinsley Sheridan as a member of thecelebrated Literary Club, he passed on him a high and merited eulogy. He who has written the two best comedies of his age is surely a consider-able man. The praise of the sober-minded critic—so chary of his praise inmost cases—sounds faint in comparison of that which others have awarded.Every reader remembers the elegant and terse judgment of Lord Byron,which moved the subject of it to tears— Whatever Sheridan has done, orchosen to do, has been par excellence always the best of

Pictures from English literature . THE RIVALS. When Dr. Johnson proposed Richard Brinsley Sheridan as a member of thecelebrated Literary Club, he passed on him a high and merited eulogy. He who has written the two best comedies of his age is surely a consider-able man. The praise of the sober-minded critic—so chary of his praise inmost cases—sounds faint in comparison of that which others have awarded.Every reader remembers the elegant and terse judgment of Lord Byron,which moved the subject of it to tears— Whatever Sheridan has done, orchosen to do, has been par excellence always the best of Stock Photo
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2148 x 1164 px | 36.4 x 19.7 cm | 14.3 x 7.8 inches | 150dpi

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Pictures from English literature . THE RIVALS. When Dr. Johnson proposed Richard Brinsley Sheridan as a member of thecelebrated Literary Club, he passed on him a high and merited eulogy. He who has written the two best comedies of his age is surely a consider-able man. The praise of the sober-minded critic—so chary of his praise inmost cases—sounds faint in comparison of that which others have awarded.Every reader remembers the elegant and terse judgment of Lord Byron,which moved the subject of it to tears— Whatever Sheridan has done, orchosen to do, has been par excellence always the best of its kind. He haswritten the best comedy, the best drama, the best farce, the best address, anddelivered the very best oration ever conceived or heard in this country. Hazlitt calls him a dramatic star of the first magnitude—a happyillustration, for he shines amid those of his age like Hesperus among thelesser lights. And, beyond all doubt, his dramas have placed him—to adoptthe words of John Wilson Croker— at the head