People dance in front of the closed Imperial Court Club, also known as Yushantang operated by high-end restaurant chain Yi Shi Liu, at Beihai Park in

- Image ID: W8YYTF
People dance in front of the closed Imperial Court Club, also known as Yushantang operated by high-end restaurant chain Yi Shi Liu, at Beihai Park in
Imaginechina Limited / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: W8YYTF
People dance in front of the closed Imperial Court Club, also known as Yushantang operated by high-end restaurant chain Yi Shi Liu, at Beihai Park in Beijing, China, 19 January 2014. The Beijing city government has issued an order to close down all private clubs and high-end entertainment venues set up at the citys spacious public parks, amid efforts to curb officials lavish lifestyles and crack the whip on corruption. With luxurious interior decor and guaranteed privacy, these establishments have attracted a sizeable clientele of government officials, although their tab is often covered by businessmen friends. Local media reports say that costs per person at such park-view restaurants range from 988 yuan (US$163) to 1,680 yuan. Zhang Yahong, a director at the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Landscape and Forestry, said at a press conference that 24 restaurants and clubs were discovered in Beijing parks during an initial investigation. One of them is the Imperial Court Club, located in a 270-year-old building at Beihai Park, one of the best-preserved imperial gardens in the capital. The club and another restaurant at Beihai Park have been ordered to suspend operations.