Oval table with falling leaves. Culture: American. Dimensions: 29 3/4 x 74 1/2 x 71 in. (75.6 x 189.2 x 180.3 cm). Date: 1690-1720. This spectacular walnut table is as fine as any made in colonial America. Its multiple turned legs and gate-like supports create a virtual forest of baluster turnings. In stark contrast to the rectilinearity of seventeenth-century tables, the gentle elliptical curve of its top invited conviviality and conversation among those seated around it. The narrow width of leather and cane chairs of this period were ideal for use among the multiple legs on tables like thes

Oval table with falling leaves. Culture: American. Dimensions: 29 3/4 x 74 1/2 x 71 in. (75.6 x 189.2 x 180.3 cm). Date: 1690-1720.  This spectacular walnut table is as fine as any made in colonial America. Its multiple turned legs and gate-like supports create a virtual forest of baluster turnings. In stark contrast to the rectilinearity of seventeenth-century tables, the gentle elliptical curve of its top invited conviviality and conversation among those seated around it. The narrow width of leather and cane chairs of this period were ideal for use among the multiple legs on tables like thes Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Album / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PA9M3G

File size:

29.1 MB (927.2 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

3539 x 2878 px | 30 x 24.4 cm | 11.8 x 9.6 inches | 300dpi

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Album

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This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Oval table with falling leaves. Culture: American. Dimensions: 29 3/4 x 74 1/2 x 71 in. (75.6 x 189.2 x 180.3 cm). Date: 1690-1720. This spectacular walnut table is as fine as any made in colonial America. Its multiple turned legs and gate-like supports create a virtual forest of baluster turnings. In stark contrast to the rectilinearity of seventeenth-century tables, the gentle elliptical curve of its top invited conviviality and conversation among those seated around it. The narrow width of leather and cane chairs of this period were ideal for use among the multiple legs on tables like these. Museum: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.