Ontario Sessional Papers, 1906, No.26-31 . ion to their grants, than the district societiesand, m some cases, much more, although their grants were smaller Otherinstances of this kind could be given. It has been suggested that the best remedy for these conditions is to doaway with all distinction between district and township societies and toso change the Act that societies will receive their grants in proportion to theamounts they actually expend for agricultural purposes. This would serve toencourage societies whose exhibitions are conducted on agricultural linesThe careful consideration of

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Ontario Sessional Papers, 1906, No.26-31 . ion to their grants, than the district societiesand, m some cases, much more, although their grants were smaller Otherinstances of this kind could be given. It has been suggested that the best remedy for these conditions is to doaway with all distinction between district and township societies and toso change the Act that societies will receive their grants in proportion to theamounts they actually expend for agricultural purposes. This would serve toencourage societies whose exhibitions are conducted on agricultural linesThe careful consideration of
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Image ID: 2AM5X60
Ontario Sessional Papers, 1906, No.26-31 . ion to their grants, than the district societiesand, m some cases, much more, although their grants were smaller Otherinstances of this kind could be given. It has been suggested that the best remedy for these conditions is to doaway with all distinction between district and township societies and toso change the Act that societies will receive their grants in proportion to theamounts they actually expend for agricultural purposes. This would serve toencourage societies whose exhibitions are conducted on agricultural linesThe careful consideration of this matter by members of agricultural socie-ties is required. Too 3IAXY EXHIBITIOXS THE CaISE OF :\IuCH OF THE PoOR WoRK DONE BY Societies. The greatest weakness in the fairs system of Ontario lies in the fact thatthere are too many exhibitions. The poor work being done by a large pro-portion of the agricultural societies can be traced direct to this cause. Manycounties have six fo twelve societies all holding annual fall exhibitions. It. A feature which always pleases at an f^xhibition. frequently occurs that these exhibitions are held within five or six miles ofeach other. The map of the province showing the location of the societiesmakes clear how thickly the country is studded with these societies. The fierce competition between the societies is largely responsible for thecomparatively recent introduction of so many undesirable features m con-nection with our exhibitions. When there are a number of exhibitions heldin a county, it means that the localities supporting each fair must necessarilybe restricted. As the government grant has to be divided between the dif-ferent societies, the share each receives is small. The average farmerdoes ;not care to attend more than one or two local fairs in a season, especiallyif he has been to attend one of the large industrial exhibitions. This meansthat where there are three or more fairs within a comparatively short dis-tance, the att