Ontario High School History of England . ionaltraveller came to Britain it was in much the same spirit ofadventure that the Briton himself now shows when he seeksthe wilds of Africa.Yet the Britons hadalready something likecivilization. Visitorsto the island were sur-prised at the largepopulation, the manyvillages, the herds ofcattle, and the exten-sive cultivation ofgrain. In the southand west were tin and lead mines. The Britons madecoarse cloth, and delighted to array themselves in its flamingcolours. The men wore long hair and shaved their faces,with the exception of the upper lip. Hospita

Ontario High School History of England . ionaltraveller came to Britain it was in much the same spirit ofadventure that the Briton himself now shows when he seeksthe wilds of Africa.Yet the Britons hadalready something likecivilization. Visitorsto the island were sur-prised at the largepopulation, the manyvillages, the herds ofcattle, and the exten-sive cultivation ofgrain. In the southand west were tin and lead mines. The Britons madecoarse cloth, and delighted to array themselves in its flamingcolours. The men wore long hair and shaved their faces,with the exception of the upper lip. Hospita Stock Photo
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Ontario High School History of England . ionaltraveller came to Britain it was in much the same spirit ofadventure that the Briton himself now shows when he seeksthe wilds of Africa.Yet the Britons hadalready something likecivilization. Visitorsto the island were sur-prised at the largepopulation, the manyvillages, the herds ofcattle, and the exten-sive cultivation ofgrain. In the southand west were tin and lead mines. The Britons madecoarse cloth, and delighted to array themselves in its flamingcolours. The men wore long hair and shaved their faces,with the exception of the upper lip. Hospitality, a frequentvirtue of rude peoples, was general, and music and athleticgames aided the entertainment of the guests. Thoughvigorous in war, the Britons were not an industriousrace; hke the Gauls, their neighbours, they were vain, idle,and quarrelsome. .-.Druidism.—The British tribes were ruled by princes, whose.-/^power was great, but not absolute, for the freemen of the tribe decided important matters. Their religion, Druidism, 11. Conjectural British War Chariot 12 HISTORY OF ENGLAND still remains vague and almost unknown to us. The priests professed to know how the sun and stars influence mans destiny. Theytaught that the soullives after death. TheDruids worshipped,not in temples builtby man, but in oakgroves; and the wor-shippers looked uponghastly spectacles,when Druid priests,offered in sacrificecondemned criminals,who were confined inhuge wicker basketsand burned. Thepriests surroundedthemselves with mys-tery, taught their stu-Britons, showing Native Costume dents in the seclusion of remote forests, and would not commit Druid doctrines to writing, lest the mysteries should be learned from any one but the priests. These were the schoolmasters of the Britons; and it was before them too that accused persons appeared. In time of danger Druid bards went about the country, and with verse and song aroused the warlike passions of the people. 1^1 The coming of Julius Caesar,

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