Ontario High School History of England . charge of thenorth of England, and there hesoon had the Court of StarChamber busy with the disciplineof such of the northern gentryas opposed the kings policy.Wcntworths belief was that theCommons, in which he had sat,should have no control of thegovernment. It was a many-headed body, often divided inopinion. He found the best security in the undividedauthority of a strong king. On this point he and Laudwere at one. When they wrote to each other they spokeof their attitude as Thorough, meaning by this thor-ough devotion to the kings interests. Thorough

Ontario High School History of England . charge of thenorth of England, and there hesoon had the Court of StarChamber busy with the disciplineof such of the northern gentryas opposed the kings policy.Wcntworths belief was that theCommons, in which he had sat,should have no control of thegovernment. It was a many-headed body, often divided inopinion. He found the best security in the undividedauthority of a strong king. On this point he and Laudwere at one. When they wrote to each other they spokeof their attitude as Thorough, meaning by this thor-ough devotion to the kings interests. Thorough Stock Photo
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1324 x 1887 px | 22.4 x 32 cm | 8.8 x 12.6 inches | 150dpi

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Ontario High School History of England . charge of thenorth of England, and there hesoon had the Court of StarChamber busy with the disciplineof such of the northern gentryas opposed the kings policy.Wcntworths belief was that theCommons, in which he had sat,should have no control of thegovernment. It was a many-headed body, often divided inopinion. He found the best security in the undividedauthority of a strong king. On this point he and Laudwere at one. When they wrote to each other they spokeof their attitude as Thorough, meaning by this thor-ough devotion to the kings interests. Thorough signifiedthat, if necessary, the king should have and use an armyto force his policy upon the nation. Wentworth in Ireland, 1633-1639.—Ireland always neededa strong ruler and, in 1633, Charles sent Wentworth overas Lord Deputy. In the last days of Elizabeth, Mountjoyhad really conquered Ireland (p. 238), and James I was thefirst king to find himself master of the whole country. Hethought he could do what he liked in Ireland. He forced. Thomas Wentworth, Earl ofStrafford (1593-1641) THE GREAT CIVIL WAR 271 the chiefs of the Irish tribes in Ulster to rule according toEnglish law, and, when they revolted, he drove them fromthe country, and confiscated no less than six counties.This land he granted freely to English and Scottish colon-ists, who poured into Ulster, were soon its masters, and hadunder their feet the helpless Irish peasantry, whose naturalleaders had been exiled. Wentworth, strong, resolute,ruthless,was ready to show Charles what a determined rulercould do. He stayed in Ireland from 1633 to 1639, and inthat time wrought seeming wonders. He checked Puri-tanism among the Protestant clergy. He aided commercialprosperity by encouraging Irish industry, especially thelinen trade. He soon scattered the pirates who hadinfested the Irish Channel. In 1634 he called together theIrish Parliament. He had himself first decided who shouldsit in it, and, of course, it did his will.

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