Ontario High School History of England . aftsmen from the continent, for the rudeEnglish were still too unskilled to do such tasks. Bedewrote many books. His Ecclesiastical History of the EngHshNation, full of stories exquisitely told, is the great work BRITAIN BEFORE THE CONQUEST 25 from which we derive most of our knowledge of the early-English. Bede translated part of the Bible into the Englishof the Angles, his people; and itis through work such as his thatthe tongue we speak to-day isknown as English rather thanby the name of one of the othertribes, Saxons, or Jutes. The sixhundred monks

Ontario High School History of England . aftsmen from the continent, for the rudeEnglish were still too unskilled to do such tasks. Bedewrote many books. His Ecclesiastical History of the EngHshNation, full of stories exquisitely told, is the great work BRITAIN BEFORE THE CONQUEST 25 from which we derive most of our knowledge of the early-English. Bede translated part of the Bible into the Englishof the Angles, his people; and itis through work such as his thatthe tongue we speak to-day isknown as English rather thanby the name of one of the othertribes, Saxons, or Jutes. The sixhundred monks Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AWHB39

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1366 x 1829 px | 23.1 x 31 cm | 9.1 x 12.2 inches | 150dpi

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Ontario High School History of England . aftsmen from the continent, for the rudeEnglish were still too unskilled to do such tasks. Bedewrote many books. His Ecclesiastical History of the EngHshNation, full of stories exquisitely told, is the great work BRITAIN BEFORE THE CONQUEST 25 from which we derive most of our knowledge of the early-English. Bede translated part of the Bible into the Englishof the Angles, his people; and itis through work such as his thatthe tongue we speak to-day isknown as English rather thanby the name of one of the othertribes, Saxons, or Jutes. The sixhundred monks at Jarrow taughtthe people agriculture, openedschools, and helped the poorand the sick, who were verynumerous in that age of pesti-lence. The English even sparedhelp for other lands. Lightwent forth from them to the darkplaces of Europe. Boniface andother English missionaries taughtin Germany, and Charlemagne, who, in 800, became Roman emperor and the greatest rulerin Europe, chose an Englishman, Alcuin, to lead in his workof education.. Bishop (about tenth century) 4. Alfred the Great A I. England divided into Northumbria, Mercia, and Wessex.— The English had come to Britain in scattered groupswhich gained a footing wherever they could drive back theBritons. These groups remained, for a time, independentof each other, often, indeed, turning their arms on oneanother. In order to retain control of the country, theinvaders were obliged to unite, and, in time, we find themgrouped together in small kingdoms. When these kingdomsnumbered seven, England was called a Heptarchy. Thechanges were ceaseless; sometimes there were more thanseven divisions, sometimes fewer. For more than a hundredyears the region north of the Humber—Northumbria—played the leading part. A large state, Mercia, grew up 26 HISTORY OF ENGLAND in the very centre of England. In the south, the foremoststate was Wessex, with Winchester as its capital. As long,however, as even three divisions remained, the Englis

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