. On the anatomy of vertebrates. Vertebrates; Anatomy, Comparative; 1866. 118 ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES. tlie upper, usually bifurcate, end of the maxillary, forms a socket on wliicli the ascending or nasal process of the premaxillary glides ; a posterior tubercle at this end is attached to the palatine, and ligaments connect the same expanded end to the nasal, the turbinal, the vomer, and the premaxillary: the lower and hinder expanded end of the bone is attached by strong elastic ligament, in which a labial gristle is commonly developed, to the lower jaw. In the Salmon and Herring tribe, the Su

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. On the anatomy of vertebrates. Vertebrates; Anatomy, Comparative; 1866. 118 ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES. tlie upper, usually bifurcate, end of the maxillary, forms a socket on wliicli the ascending or nasal process of the premaxillary glides ; a posterior tubercle at this end is attached to the palatine, and ligaments connect the same expanded end to the nasal, the turbinal, the vomer, and the premaxillary: the lower and hinder expanded end of the bone is attached by strong elastic ligament, in which a labial gristle is commonly developed, to the lower jaw. In the Salmon and Herring tribe, the Sudis, fig. 86, 21, Amia, and most Ganoids, the maxillary supports teeth. In the Plecto- gnathi (Globe-fish and File-fish), the maxillaries coalesce wholly or in part with the premaxillaries. In the Lepi- dosteus the contrary condition prevails: the jiremaxillary and maxillary Ijones constitute, indeed, a single dentigcrous arch or border of the upper jaw, as in DisarticuMed bones of pai.hv fig- 86, but are Subdivided into many maxillary arch (4™ya;mo(,/(7od bone: the premaxillary is also siuo-le in l\forim/nis. The ccnifluent premaxillaries constitute the sword- like anterior prolongation of the snout in Xiphias, and are firmlv. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Owen, Richard, 1804-1892; Cornell University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Flower-Sprecher Veterinary Library. fmo. London, Longmans, Green

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