. North American trees : being descriptions and illustrations of the trees growing independently of cultivation in North America, north of Mexico and the West Indies . Trees. 348 The Elms The name "winged" elm is with reference to the plentiful development of corky wings on its branches; it is also commonly known as Wahoo. The bark is thin, shallowly fissured, scaly and light reddish brown. The young twigs are very finely and sparingly hairy, or quite smooth, and usually develop corky wings which are long-persistent. The leaves are oblong to oblong-ovate or oblong-lanceolate, sharp-

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. North American trees : being descriptions and illustrations of the trees growing independently of cultivation in North America, north of Mexico and the West Indies . Trees. 348 The Elms The name "winged" elm is with reference to the plentiful development of corky wings on its branches; it is also commonly known as Wahoo. The bark is thin, shallowly fissured, scaly and light reddish brown. The young twigs are very finely and sparingly hairy, or quite smooth, and usually develop corky wings which are long-persistent. The leaves are oblong to oblong-ovate or oblong-lanceolate, sharp-
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Image ID: PG1D1K
. North American trees : being descriptions and illustrations of the trees growing independently of cultivation in North America, north of Mexico and the West Indies . Trees. 348 The Elms The name "winged" elm is with reference to the plentiful development of corky wings on its branches; it is also commonly known as Wahoo. The bark is thin, shallowly fissured, scaly and light reddish brown. The young twigs are very finely and sparingly hairy, or quite smooth, and usually develop corky wings which are long-persistent. The leaves are oblong to oblong-ovate or oblong-lanceolate, sharp- pointed, often curved, thick, rather coarsely doubly toothed, and 8 cm. long or less; the upper surface is dark green, duU and smooth at maturity, the lower surface lighter green and hairy, at least along the numerous promi- nent veins; the leaf-stalks are seldom more than 5 mm. long and the large thin stipules fall away early. The tree blooms in earliest spring before the leaves unfold; the drooping flowers are in small, smooth clusters, with a 5-lobed calyx about one half the length of the stamens, and a short hairy ovary. The samaras are oblong or elliptic, hairy all over, long-fringed on the edges, 6 to lo mm. long, the 2 long beaks slightly in- curved. The wood is hard, light brown, difficult to work, and not strong; it has a Um- ited use for tool-handles; the specific gravity is about 0.75. The tree is much planted for shade and ornament in the southern States, but is not certainly hardy much to the north of New York City.. Fig. 305. — Winged Elm. 5. WHITE ELM—Ulmns americana Linnaeus Ulmtis floridana Chapman This, the largest of our elms, ranges from Newfoundland to Florida, westward to Saskatchewan, South Dakota, western Kansas, and Texas. It reaches its greatest development in moist soil, but grows well on hillsides and uplands. In New England it sometimes attains a height of about 40 meters, vnth a buttressed trunk occasionally 3.5 meters in diameter, but in the s