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. Negro slavery in the northern colonies. 657527. /. It will be noticed that no slaves are accredited to Massachus-etts by the first census. Concerning this point the following notesare of interest. Massachusetts has enjoyed the distinction of ap-pearing in the first census of the United States without any slavesamong her population. The following anecdoteconnected with thissubject it is believed, has never been made public. In 1790 a cen-sus was ordered by the General Government then newly established,and the Marshal of the Massachusetts district had the care of makingQtye survey. When he inq

. Negro slavery in the northern colonies. 657527. /. It will be noticed that no slaves are accredited to Massachus-etts by the first census. Concerning this point the following notesare of interest. Massachusetts has enjoyed the distinction of ap-pearing in the first census of the United States without any slavesamong her population. The following anecdoteconnected with thissubject it is believed, has never been made public. In 1790 a cen-sus was ordered by the General Government then newly established,and the Marshal of the Massachusetts district had the care of makingQtye survey. When he inq Stock Photo
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. Negro slavery in the northern colonies. 657527. /. It will be noticed that no slaves are accredited to Massachus-etts by the first census. Concerning this point the following notesare of interest. Massachusetts has enjoyed the distinction of ap-pearing in the first census of the United States without any slavesamong her population. The following anecdoteconnected with thissubject it is believed, has never been made public. In 1790 a cen-sus was ordered by the General Government then newly established,and the Marshal of the Massachusetts district had the care of makingQtye survey. When he inquired for slaves, most people answered none:if anyone said that he had one, the Marshal would ask him if he meantto be singular, and Y/ould tell him that no other perso:i had given inany. The answer then was, «If no^e are given in, I will not be singular, °,nd thus the list was completed without any number in the col-uran for slaves. Life of Belknap, pp. 164-5. 1. Const. Hist, of U. S. 1750-1832, 280. 2. Hist, of Slavery in Mass., 247.. Dr. Belknaps own account of this census, written and published in1795, is as follows: In 1790, a census of the United States was mmade by order of the Federal government; the schedule sent out onthat occasion contained three columns for free whites of several de-scriptions, which, in the state of Massachusetts and district of KMaine amounted to 469326; a fourth for all other free persons, anda fifth for slaves. There beinp; none put into the last column,Cfc>became necessary to put the blacks, with the Indians, into the fourthcolumn, and the amount was 6001. Of this number, I suppose the Isblacks were upwards of 4000; and of the remaining 2000, many v/erea mixed breed, between Indians and blacks**^. In the same census,as hath been before observed, no slaves are set down to Massachusetts.This return, made: by the marshal!, of the district, may be consideredas the formal evidence of the abolition of slavery in Massachusetts,especially as no pe

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