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Negative stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of some of the ultrastructural morphology of the A/CA/4/09 swine flu virus. Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. Swine flu viruses cause high levels of illness and low death rates in pigs. Swine influenza viruses may circulate among swine throughout the year, but most outbreaks occur during the late fall and winter months similar to outbreaks in humans. The classical swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isol

Negative stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of some of the ultrastructural morphology of the A/CA/4/09 swine flu virus. Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. Swine flu viruses cause high levels of illness and low death rates in pigs. Swine influenza viruses may circulate among swine throughout the year, but most outbreaks occur during the late fall and winter months similar to outbreaks in humans. The classical swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isol Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Science History Images / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2BE0GE0

File size:

12.4 MB (923.9 KB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2300 x 1889 px | 38.9 x 32 cm | 15.3 x 12.6 inches | 150dpi

Date taken:

29 April 2009

Photographer:

Photo Researchers

More information:

This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

Negative stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of some of the ultrastructural morphology of the A/CA/4/09 swine flu virus. Swine Influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. Swine flu viruses cause high levels of illness and low death rates in pigs. Swine influenza viruses may circulate among swine throughout the year, but most outbreaks occur during the late fall and winter months similar to outbreaks in humans. The classical swine flu virus (an influenza type A H1N1 virus) was first isolated from a pig in 1930. Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. However, sporadic human infections with swine flu have occurred. Most commonly, these cases occur in persons with direct exposure to pigs (e.g. children near pigs at a fair or workers in the swine industry). In addition, there have been documented cases of one person spreading swine flu to others. For example, an outbreak of apparent swine flu infection in pigs in Wisconsin in 1988 resulted in multiple human infections, and, although no community outbreak resulted, there was antibody evidence of virus transmission from the patient to health care workers who had close contact with the patient.

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