. Natural history. Zoology. 420 REPTILIAâORDER III.âSQUAMATA. of which the teeth in the fore part of tlie jaws are superior in size to those be- hind, while the head is covered with sliields, the scales on the body are smooth and there are, at most, but shallow pits in the so-called labial shields of the muzzle. AH the members of the genus are inhabitants of Tropical America the largest not exceeding seven feet in length. The presence of deep pits in the labial shields serves to distinguish the species of the nearly allied genus Gorallus, of which four are from Tropical America, while the fift

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. Natural history. Zoology. 420 REPTILIAâORDER III.âSQUAMATA. of which the teeth in the fore part of tlie jaws are superior in size to those be- hind, while the head is covered with sliields, the scales on the body are smooth and there are, at most, but shallow pits in the so-called labial shields of the muzzle. AH the members of the genus are inhabitants of Tropical America the largest not exceeding seven feet in length. The presence of deep pits in the labial shields serves to distinguish the species of the nearly allied genus Gorallus, of which four are from Tropical America, while the fifth-is found in Madagascar. Four other snakes from the Moluccas, New Guinea, and Oceania, constitute the genus Bnygrus, which differs from both the preceding in having ridges on the scales of the body. These boas do not appear to molest human beings, but the case is different with the anaconda (Eunedes murinus) of Tropical America, which grows to thirty feet or more in length. [n common with three other genera from the same countries, two of which are respectively represented by a single species, while the third in- cludes several, the anaconda differs from all the foregoing in that the front teeth are not greatly enlarged, the whole series gradually diminishing in height from before backwards. Among the distinctive generic characters of the anaconda may be noticed the small size of the scales. Its general colour is olive or greyish-brown on the upper surface, upon which are one or two rows of large, dark, transversely-elongated blotches, and one or two of eye- like spots on the sides. The anaconda is essentially a water-snake, and in those parts of its habitat which are subject to along period of drought, it buries itself in the dried river mud till the return of moister conditions. In the anaconda one of the pairs of shields on the head, technically known as nasals, come into contact with one another in the middle line behind the muzzle, but in the nearly-allied snakes formin