. Moray and Nairn. the otherheights are: Cam Sgumain (1370), Maol an Tailleir(1373), Hill of Aitnoch (1351), Cam a Gharbh Ghlaic(1523), Cam nan tri-tighearnan (2013), Cam na Sguabaich(1522), Cam Allt Laoigh (1872). Grouse moors arenumerous and a large part of the area is devoted tograzing. The scantiness of the population is accountedfor by the sterility of the soil and the moist climate. 5. Watershed. Rivers. Lakes. Coast=line. The general slope of the county is to the north andeast, so that the rivers flow in a north-easterly direction.The two spurs from the Grampians which enter thecounty f

. Moray and Nairn. the otherheights are: Cam Sgumain (1370), Maol an Tailleir(1373), Hill of Aitnoch (1351), Cam a Gharbh Ghlaic(1523), Cam nan tri-tighearnan (2013), Cam na Sguabaich(1522), Cam Allt Laoigh (1872). Grouse moors arenumerous and a large part of the area is devoted tograzing. The scantiness of the population is accountedfor by the sterility of the soil and the moist climate. 5. Watershed. Rivers. Lakes. Coast=line. The general slope of the county is to the north andeast, so that the rivers flow in a north-easterly direction.The two spurs from the Grampians which enter thecounty f Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AG159G

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7.1 MB (457.6 KB Compressed download)

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1236 x 2021 px | 20.9 x 34.2 cm | 8.2 x 13.5 inches | 150dpi

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. Moray and Nairn. the otherheights are: Cam Sgumain (1370), Maol an Tailleir(1373), Hill of Aitnoch (1351), Cam a Gharbh Ghlaic(1523), Cam nan tri-tighearnan (2013), Cam na Sguabaich(1522), Cam Allt Laoigh (1872). Grouse moors arenumerous and a large part of the area is devoted tograzing. The scantiness of the population is accountedfor by the sterility of the soil and the moist climate. 5. Watershed. Rivers. Lakes. Coast=line. The general slope of the county is to the north andeast, so that the rivers flow in a north-easterly direction.The two spurs from the Grampians which enter thecounty form the principal watersheds. The northernslope of the more southerly spur drains into the Findhornby several streams, including the Rhilean Burn, theLeonach Burn, and the Tomlachlan Burn. The southernside of the northerly spur, including Cam nan tri-tigh-earnan, is also drained by the Findhorn ; while therainfall of the northern side and of practically all thecounty to the north of it finds its way to the Firth by. 108 NAIRNSHIRE the river Nairn and the Muckle Burn, with theirnumerous tributaries. The Findhorn rises in the Monagh Lea Hills inInverness-shire and has a course of nineteen miles throughNairnshire. Entering the county by a narrow defile atPollochaig in the south-west, the river flows in a north-easterly direction. The first part of its course in thecounty lies through the Streens, a highly picturesquedistrict. At Dulsie the river has hewn out a yawningchasm, which is spanned by a bridge of one arch con-structed by General Wade in connection with his militaryroad from Grantown to Fort George (see p. 113). The sur-rounding scenery is wild in the extreme, and for the nextten miles the course of the river is very romantic. AtFerness, about two miles below Dulsie Bridge, the Find-horn sweeps round a rocky peninsula, and here the sceneryis of the grandest description. Many of the rocks rise infantastic shapes to a great height sheer from the river-bed, and the surroundin

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