The Marriage at Cana, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
RM2A52JMXThe Marriage at Cana, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
The Entry into Jerusalem, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
RM2A52F6XThe Entry into Jerusalem, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
Jesus Raises Jairus's Daughter from the Dead, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
RM2A519K4Jesus Raises Jairus's Daughter from the Dead, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
Jesus Heals the Nobleman's Son in Capernaum, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
RM2A519K8Jesus Heals the Nobleman's Son in Capernaum, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604.
Moses praying to end the serpents’ attack on the Israelites, from a Mir’at al-quds (Mirror of Holiness) of Father Jerome Xavier (Spanish, 1549-1617), 1602-1604.
RM2A51KGJMoses praying to end the serpents’ attack on the Israelites, from a Mir’at al-quds (Mirror of Holiness) of Father Jerome Xavier (Spanish, 1549-1617), 1602-1604.
The Flagellation, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. This is the last illustration in the Cleveland manuscript of the Mir’at al-quds. It depicts the scene of the flagellation of Jesus, but it foreshadows the Crucifixion, since his feet are elevated off the ground. His facial expression combines both pain and compassion as he is whipped by Roman soldiers. Although the Crucifixion is the most important event in the narrative of the life of Jesus, it is not depicted in this manuscript. This is perhaps due to the discomfort of Mughal painte
RM2A52FHXThe Flagellation, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. This is the last illustration in the Cleveland manuscript of the Mir’at al-quds. It depicts the scene of the flagellation of Jesus, but it foreshadows the Crucifixion, since his feet are elevated off the ground. His facial expression combines both pain and compassion as he is whipped by Roman soldiers. Although the Crucifixion is the most important event in the narrative of the life of Jesus, it is not depicted in this manuscript. This is perhaps due to the discomfort of Mughal painte
Simeon Kneels in Front of Mary and Jesus After Recognizing Them, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. Simeon had heard a prophecy that he would encounter the Messiah with his mother in the temple at Jerusalem. This painting depicts his moment of recognition that the prophecy had come true. The temple is populated by Jewish teachers and scholars, and a number of unusual visual elements. A dragon-headed vase is set by the stairs; curled dogs and a kneeling figure are carved like bas-reliefs into the pillars of the temple, which also has niches for
RM2A5269DSimeon Kneels in Front of Mary and Jesus After Recognizing Them, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. Simeon had heard a prophecy that he would encounter the Messiah with his mother in the temple at Jerusalem. This painting depicts his moment of recognition that the prophecy had come true. The temple is populated by Jewish teachers and scholars, and a number of unusual visual elements. A dragon-headed vase is set by the stairs; curled dogs and a kneeling figure are carved like bas-reliefs into the pillars of the temple, which also has niches for
The Magi Follow the Star, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. One of the three kings points excitedly at the star at the upper left edge of the page, while another bites the finger of astonishment; the third holds his fist over his heart. They are all dressed like Portuguese merchants, but they ride camels associated with their homeland in Arabia, as specified in the text. At the breakaway court of Prince Salim in Allahabad, high-quality materials were not as plentiful as in the imperial capital. The paper is brittle and has browned excessively
RM2A52JM3The Magi Follow the Star, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. One of the three kings points excitedly at the star at the upper left edge of the page, while another bites the finger of astonishment; the third holds his fist over his heart. They are all dressed like Portuguese merchants, but they ride camels associated with their homeland in Arabia, as specified in the text. At the breakaway court of Prince Salim in Allahabad, high-quality materials were not as plentiful as in the imperial capital. The paper is brittle and has browned excessively
Jesus writes on the ground, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. As Jesus was debating with the scribes and Pharisees in Jerusalem they brought before him an adulterous woman and, hoping to incite him to violence, claimed that if Jesus followed the law of Moses he should order her to be stoned to death. Jesus responded, "Let whichever of you is without sin cast the first stone." Then he began to write with his finger on the ground, and each of the men saw a description of his own sins. The two men in the bottom corner of the painting s
RM2A519K7Jesus writes on the ground, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. As Jesus was debating with the scribes and Pharisees in Jerusalem they brought before him an adulterous woman and, hoping to incite him to violence, claimed that if Jesus followed the law of Moses he should order her to be stoned to death. Jesus responded, "Let whichever of you is without sin cast the first stone." Then he began to write with his finger on the ground, and each of the men saw a description of his own sins. The two men in the bottom corner of the painting s
Mary Magdalene Presents Ointment to Jesus, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. While Jesus dined in the house of a Pharisee he was approached by Mary Magdalene, who threw herself to the ground weeping. Having wetted Jesus’s feet with her tears, she dried them with her hair and then bathed them with expensive ointment. Mary’s veil falls around her shoulders to reveal her hair’s disarray. Only Jesus appears to be calm as he extends his arms in a pacifying gesture; the other men point at their mouths and at each other, astonis
RM2A51HBJMary Magdalene Presents Ointment to Jesus, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. While Jesus dined in the house of a Pharisee he was approached by Mary Magdalene, who threw herself to the ground weeping. Having wetted Jesus’s feet with her tears, she dried them with her hair and then bathed them with expensive ointment. Mary’s veil falls around her shoulders to reveal her hair’s disarray. Only Jesus appears to be calm as he extends his arms in a pacifying gesture; the other men point at their mouths and at each other, astonis
The Adoration of the Magi, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. In this Nativity scene, familiar in Christian contexts, Mary and Joseph present the infant Jesus to the three Magi, who have placed their crowns on the ground in homage to the King of Kings. The three Magi are portrayed in Portuguese costumes to indicate to a Mughal audience that they are foreigners who believed in Christ. The artist cleverly and humorously indicates that the Magi have just arrived in Bethlehem by depicting their three camels in the bottom corner. One exhausted came
RM2A52D7WThe Adoration of the Magi, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. In this Nativity scene, familiar in Christian contexts, Mary and Joseph present the infant Jesus to the three Magi, who have placed their crowns on the ground in homage to the King of Kings. The three Magi are portrayed in Portuguese costumes to indicate to a Mughal audience that they are foreigners who believed in Christ. The artist cleverly and humorously indicates that the Magi have just arrived in Bethlehem by depicting their three camels in the bottom corner. One exhausted came
The Adoration of the Shepherds, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. Without reading the text, it would be difficult to identify the adorers in Portuguese dress. They are the shepherds who have come to worship the newborn Christ child, held out for viewing by Mary, depicted in relatively large scale. Mary and Jesus stand in a fenced enclosure, evocative of a sacred space within a rather sumptuous setting with pseudo-Renaissance Ionic columns and heavy red draperies. The finishing details on this painting, such as two of the shepherds’ fee
RM2A52D81The Adoration of the Shepherds, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. Without reading the text, it would be difficult to identify the adorers in Portuguese dress. They are the shepherds who have come to worship the newborn Christ child, held out for viewing by Mary, depicted in relatively large scale. Mary and Jesus stand in a fenced enclosure, evocative of a sacred space within a rather sumptuous setting with pseudo-Renaissance Ionic columns and heavy red draperies. The finishing details on this painting, such as two of the shepherds’ fee
John the Baptist recognizes Christ by the appearance of a dove, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. This scene of John the Baptist’s recognition of Jesus is set in a lavishly decorated Mughal courtyard. The artist has closely followed Father Jerome’s text, which tells of the Holy Spirit taking the form of a dove that sits atop Jesus’s head, rather than the text of the Gospels, which describes the dove as hovering in the air. John wears the black robes of a Jesuit, garb that in the context of the Mughal court identifies him
RM2A519MKJohn the Baptist recognizes Christ by the appearance of a dove, from a Mirror of Holiness (Mir’at al-quds) of Father Jerome Xavier, 1602-1604. This scene of John the Baptist’s recognition of Jesus is set in a lavishly decorated Mughal courtyard. The artist has closely followed Father Jerome’s text, which tells of the Holy Spirit taking the form of a dove that sits atop Jesus’s head, rather than the text of the Gospels, which describes the dove as hovering in the air. John wears the black robes of a Jesuit, garb that in the context of the Mughal court identifies him