Milk, cheese and butter, a practical handbook on their properties and the processes of their production . ht to be so thinas to tax the skill and patience of the dair)er ; then he can comforthimself with the reflection that all the rest is in the cheese. Wehave already recommended the separator for this purpose in cheesefactories. With present conditions it is desirable to scald the cream to atemperature of 150 F., and keep it at that for twenty minutes, sodestroying the living ferments, and checking further fermentation bysalting the cream at the rate of two ounces to the gallon, andstirring

Milk, cheese and butter, a practical handbook on their properties and the processes of their production . ht to be so thinas to tax the skill and patience of the dair)er ; then he can comforthimself with the reflection that all the rest is in the cheese. Wehave already recommended the separator for this purpose in cheesefactories. With present conditions it is desirable to scald the cream to atemperature of 150 F., and keep it at that for twenty minutes, sodestroying the living ferments, and checking further fermentation bysalting the cream at the rate of two ounces to the gallon, andstirring Stock Photo
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Milk, cheese and butter, a practical handbook on their properties and the processes of their production . ht to be so thinas to tax the skill and patience of the dair)er ; then he can comforthimself with the reflection that all the rest is in the cheese. Wehave already recommended the separator for this purpose in cheesefactories. With present conditions it is desirable to scald the cream to atemperature of 150 F., and keep it at that for twenty minutes, sodestroying the living ferments, and checking further fermentation bysalting the cream at the rate of two ounces to the gallon, andstirring the while. It should then be set in a glazed pan, providedwith a tap or wooden plug at its lower edge (Fig. 206), but shouldnot be filled beyond two-thirds of its depth, the rest being filled withcold spring water, and mix well. The cream will rise to the surface, leaving the whey removed in skimming mingled with the water;and these should be drawn off next morning. After this themanagement should be as with milk cream. The long-keepingt|uality is due both to the early fermentation and the after-check. Fig. 206.—Whev Cream Pan. BUTTER-MAKING. 333 put upon it. The butter if made for table use benefits by being kepta few days. There is not the room in butter-making for compensations formismanagement which is afforded by cheese-making. Errors inripening, for instance, cannot be set right to any appreciable extent, the effects being physical as well as chemical, and the latter aremainly brought in to help the fonner in their setting free the fats.The purely physical and mechanical laws, when transgressed, placethe results almost entirely beyond remedy. But, on the other hand, butter-making is far simpler than cheese-making ; in it there are morefixed rules, and fewer occasions where the judgment can err. Theresults are also more easily reduced to uniformity ; and with theconstant and widespread teaching which is being given on thissubject, we ought speedily to put an end to the comp