. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. They went trooping into different rooms. Oh, that was a great day for Socrates! Rocmtcx C Everything was new and beautiful. Ho wont i c* into a room with several other little hoys.They sat on long stone benches aroundthe sides of the room. On the wall hunglyres and tibas. A young man sat on a chairin the front. lie had a lyre on his knee.Take your lyres, said the teacher. Eaeli boy took a lyre from the wall. Theplectrum hung from it by a ribbon. Socra-tes had never held a lyre before, but he hadoften seen other people play them. So heset it on his knee and

. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. They went trooping into different rooms. Oh, that was a great day for Socrates! Rocmtcx C Everything was new and beautiful. Ho wont i c* into a room with several other little hoys.They sat on long stone benches aroundthe sides of the room. On the wall hunglyres and tibas. A young man sat on a chairin the front. lie had a lyre on his knee.Take your lyres, said the teacher. Eaeli boy took a lyre from the wall. Theplectrum hung from it by a ribbon. Socra-tes had never held a lyre before, but he hadoften seen other people play them. So heset it on his knee and Stock Photo
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. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. They went trooping into different rooms. Oh, that was a great day for Socrates! Rocmtcx C Everything was new and beautiful. Ho wont i c* into a room with several other little hoys.They sat on long stone benches aroundthe sides of the room. On the wall hunglyres and tibas. A young man sat on a chairin the front. lie had a lyre on his knee.Take your lyres, said the teacher. Eaeli boy took a lyre from the wall. Theplectrum hung from it by a ribbon. Socra-tes had never held a lyre before, but he hadoften seen other people play them. So heset it on his knee and put his left hand behindit, and took the plectrum in his right hand,just as he ought to do. The teacher lookedat Socrates and said: What is the new boys name? Socrates. Do you wish to learn to play the lyre,Socrates ? Yes. Why? Because it is beautiful. 230 Men of Old Greece Socrates, I wish you to study music, be-cause it will make you graceful and gentle.A man who knows nothing of music will becruel and ungentlernanly. Now tune the. BOYS WITH LYRE strings. And so the music-lesson wenton. After a while the boys went into anotherroom. There another master taught themhow to make letters on wax tablets. This is not so much fun as the music,thought Socrates. Socrates 231 Tie hoard the bigger hoys in the next room.They were reciting poetry. Some time I shall be able to do that,thonirht he, and that will be fine/ r~> Late in the morning his class went intostiii another room. There they began tolearn to count. At the end of that lessonschool was over for the morning. Every-body ran laughing and shouting into thecourt. The pedagogues of the rich boysbrought lunches and spread them out fortheir little masters. Socrates had only someslices of bread spread with honey. He hadsoon finished eating and was talking toCleon, a boy near him. Was it you reciting poetry this morn- ing? Yes; and I got my knuckles crackedbecause I didnt stand gracefully.Oh, do you stand when you say it?Why, yes,