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. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. hours every day he must goto the gymnasium in the Plane-tree Grove.Ion was often there to watch him. Afterwork was finished the old man took the boyfor a walk. Sometimes it was along thebanks of the Eurotas, out into the country.Sometimes it was about the city, to see thestatues and public buildings. Always Leonidas learned something newduring those walks. Perhaps Ion told himthe story of Troy or of some god. Perhapslie taught him some wise saying of Lycur-gus. Perhaps he took stones and showedhim how to count. Perhaps, as they stoodbefore a statue, Leonida

. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. hours every day he must goto the gymnasium in the Plane-tree Grove.Ion was often there to watch him. Afterwork was finished the old man took the boyfor a walk. Sometimes it was along thebanks of the Eurotas, out into the country.Sometimes it was about the city, to see thestatues and public buildings. Always Leonidas learned something newduring those walks. Perhaps Ion told himthe story of Troy or of some god. Perhapslie taught him some wise saying of Lycur-gus. Perhaps he took stones and showedhim how to count. Perhaps, as they stoodbefore a statue, Leonida Stock Photo
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Contributor:

Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CEGE2W

File size:

7.1 MB (629.8 KB Compressed download)

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Dimensions:

1871 x 1335 px | 31.7 x 22.6 cm | 12.5 x 8.9 inches | 150dpi

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This image is a public domain image, which means either that copyright has expired in the image or the copyright holder has waived their copyright. Alamy charges you a fee for access to the high resolution copy of the image.

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. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. hours every day he must goto the gymnasium in the Plane-tree Grove.Ion was often there to watch him. Afterwork was finished the old man took the boyfor a walk. Sometimes it was along thebanks of the Eurotas, out into the country.Sometimes it was about the city, to see thestatues and public buildings. Always Leonidas learned something newduring those walks. Perhaps Ion told himthe story of Troy or of some god. Perhapslie taught him some wise saying of Lycur-gus. Perhaps he took stones and showedhim how to count. Perhaps, as they stoodbefore a statue, Leonidas learned to spellout the name of Zeus or of Heracles or ofSparta. Perhaps Ion taught him to sing abattle-song. Leonidas had no other school o than these tales and the gymnasium. That gymnasium was to Leonidas thepleasantest place in Sparta. At the en- 46 Men of Old Greece trance stood a bronze statue of Heracles.Porches ran around the four sides of a court.Back of them opened the wide doors ofdressing-rooms. Men were walking along. INTERIOR OF THE GYMNASIUM the porches, talking and laughing. Ionleaned against one of the columns. Thecourt was filled with boys at work. Somewere throwing the disc. This was a roundplate of lead or of stone. It was thick in the 47 middle and thinner at the cdg<v-. Thetirower held it in his right hand. He swungit back and forth, to get a good movement.Then he threw it. The game was to findwho could throw the farthest. Some boys were jumping. The jumperheld a lead weight in each hand. He swungthem back and forth, to give himself a goodstart. Then he threw them behind him andjumped. That backward push sent himahead. Other boys were throwing spears at amark. These spears had leather strapswound around them at the balancing point.The thrower put his finger through the loop.When he threw, he held the strap for a sec-ond. That made the spear whirl. It boredinto the target. With every group of boys was a teacher.He allowed no laziness. You are not here

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