Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall (1918)
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Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall (1918)
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. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. fcO PS «u PH aa H feO 02 Men of Old Greece BY JENNIE HALL Author uf Four Old Greeks, uiul Vikiny Tales WITH hi (.HI FLLL-PA » I v f FOKTY-IHKKI. I LITJ.TKATIONS BOSTON LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY 1918 TFmenofoldgreeceby00hall
RM2CEGFGN. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. fcO PS «u PH aa H feO 02 Men of Old Greece BY JENNIE HALL Author uf Four Old Greeks, uiul Vikiny Tales WITH hi (.HI FLLL-PA » I v f FOKTY-IHKKI. I LITJ.TKATIONS BOSTON LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY 1918 TFmenofoldgreeceby00hall
Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall (1918)
RMFRCMCKMen of old Greece, by Jennie Hall (1918)
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. ed theirtongues and drew their heiirts out of them. Here in the pediment were Athene andPoseidon striving for Athens. There stoodtheir horses and chariots, large as life.Poseidon angrily turned to go. Athenejoyfully strode to step into her chariot.And the pediment was crowded with herhappy friends. All these statues shone withbronze and gold and color. Below werethe great white columns and the shadyporch. The wall at the back was bright-ened with painted and gilded vines andbands. The porch stretched down the longside and all around the building. Underits r
RM2CEG7NN. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. ed theirtongues and drew their heiirts out of them. Here in the pediment were Athene andPoseidon striving for Athens. There stoodtheir horses and chariots, large as life.Poseidon angrily turned to go. Athenejoyfully strode to step into her chariot.And the pediment was crowded with herhappy friends. All these statues shone withbronze and gold and color. Below werethe great white columns and the shadyporch. The wall at the back was bright-ened with painted and gilded vines andbands. The porch stretched down the longside and all around the building. Underits r
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. en turned their backs and all ran 74 Men of Old Greece toward the wall. When the Persians sawthem running away, they shouted andclapped their heels to their horses and rodeafter them. They laughed and waved theirswords and forgot to be careful. That waswhat Leonidas wanted. At last he gaveanother signal, and the Greeks turned in aflash and marched back against the Persiansand cut them down and made them flee tocamp. That was near night. Then the Greeksbuilt fires before the walls and cooked theirsuppers and ate. Every man slept in hisarmor that night, with
RM2CEGD9M. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. en turned their backs and all ran 74 Men of Old Greece toward the wall. When the Persians sawthem running away, they shouted andclapped their heels to their horses and rodeafter them. They laughed and waved theirswords and forgot to be careful. That waswhat Leonidas wanted. At last he gaveanother signal, and the Greeks turned in aflash and marched back against the Persiansand cut them down and made them flee tocamp. That was near night. Then the Greeksbuilt fires before the walls and cooked theirsuppers and ate. Every man slept in hisarmor that night, with
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. dle of 227 tablets and hooks. Socrates took his fathershand and smiled up at him. You are my pedagogue, fatlier. Youare heller than any servant. Yes, and here1 we go.v And they fell inat the end of the line. As the column turned in at the school-house door, Socrates left his father, saying: Good-by, father, Ill tell you all about itto-night. The building where they were turning in was a one-story white-plastered house. When they came into the court, Socrates turned to the boy behind him and said: E-h-h! Pretty! His eyes were shin- ing. The court was a large
RM2CEG75N. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. dle of 227 tablets and hooks. Socrates took his fathershand and smiled up at him. You are my pedagogue, fatlier. Youare heller than any servant. Yes, and here1 we go.v And they fell inat the end of the line. As the column turned in at the school-house door, Socrates left his father, saying: Good-by, father, Ill tell you all about itto-night. The building where they were turning in was a one-story white-plastered house. When they came into the court, Socrates turned to the boy behind him and said: E-h-h! Pretty! His eyes were shin- ing. The court was a large
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. the Acropolis.We stayed there when you went because wethought Apollo meant that. But the Per-sians shot burning arrows, and our woodenwalls fell in fire. But even then the enemy 148 Men of Old Greece could not get up to us, for we rolled greatrocks down the steep sides. But at last afew crawled up where we had no guards.Then some of us died fighting. Some ran tothe holy altar of Athene, but the Persianskilled them there. When I saw that the fightwas lost, I ran to tell you. I went down theunderground stair and through the cave.Surely Athene guarded me as I
RM2CEGB5C. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. the Acropolis.We stayed there when you went because wethought Apollo meant that. But the Per-sians shot burning arrows, and our woodenwalls fell in fire. But even then the enemy 148 Men of Old Greece could not get up to us, for we rolled greatrocks down the steep sides. But at last afew crawled up where we had no guards.Then some of us died fighting. Some ran tothe holy altar of Athene, but the Persianskilled them there. When I saw that the fightwas lost, I ran to tell you. I went down theunderground stair and through the cave.Surely Athene guarded me as I
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. orning, when the summer hadcome, the soldiers saw him standing in frontof the cam]). He was staring at the groundin deep thought. What do you suppose he is thinking 246 Men of Old Greece about? asked the soldiers among them-selves. After an hour or two they looked again.He was still standing in the same position.They laughed and said,Let us watch him. He did not move all day. At suppersome of the soldiers said, Why not take our blankets out thereand see whether he stays all night ? So they did. They laughed and jokedabout him until nearly midnight. Theythen
RM2CEG5W1. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. orning, when the summer hadcome, the soldiers saw him standing in frontof the cam]). He was staring at the groundin deep thought. What do you suppose he is thinking 246 Men of Old Greece about? asked the soldiers among them-selves. After an hour or two they looked again.He was still standing in the same position.They laughed and said,Let us watch him. He did not move all day. At suppersome of the soldiers said, Why not take our blankets out thereand see whether he stays all night ? So they did. They laughed and jokedabout him until nearly midnight. Theythen
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. 20 Men of Old Greece A pottery-seller had his little table full ofred and black vases. Come buy a Marathon vase, he called,painted with pictures of our gloriousbattle. And among those dozens of tables and cry-ing merchants walked the men of Athens.Their slaves followed with baskets andmoney-bags. Some were buying vegetablesand fruits and wines and meat and breadand cakes for dinner. Others were buyingclothes and sandals; others, vases, jewels,lamps, olive oil. So the baskets of the slaveswere filled. This sight delights my eyes, said a manwho stood talking
RM2CEGBXH. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. 20 Men of Old Greece A pottery-seller had his little table full ofred and black vases. Come buy a Marathon vase, he called,painted with pictures of our gloriousbattle. And among those dozens of tables and cry-ing merchants walked the men of Athens.Their slaves followed with baskets andmoney-bags. Some were buying vegetablesand fruits and wines and meat and breadand cakes for dinner. Others were buyingclothes and sandals; others, vases, jewels,lamps, olive oil. So the baskets of the slaveswere filled. This sight delights my eyes, said a manwho stood talking
. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. hours every day he must goto the gymnasium in the Plane-tree Grove.Ion was often there to watch him. Afterwork was finished the old man took the boyfor a walk. Sometimes it was along thebanks of the Eurotas, out into the country.Sometimes it was about the city, to see thestatues and public buildings. Always Leonidas learned something newduring those walks. Perhaps Ion told himthe story of Troy or of some god. Perhapslie taught him some wise saying of Lycur-gus. Perhaps he took stones and showedhim how to count. Perhaps, as they stoodbefore a statue, Leonida
RM2CEGE2W. Men of old Greece, by Jennie Hall. hours every day he must goto the gymnasium in the Plane-tree Grove.Ion was often there to watch him. Afterwork was finished the old man took the boyfor a walk. Sometimes it was along thebanks of the Eurotas, out into the country.Sometimes it was about the city, to see thestatues and public buildings. Always Leonidas learned something newduring those walks. Perhaps Ion told himthe story of Troy or of some god. Perhapslie taught him some wise saying of Lycur-gus. Perhaps he took stones and showedhim how to count. Perhaps, as they stoodbefore a statue, Leonida