. Memorial, presented by the Trustees of the Sanitary District of Chicago to the Congress of the United States : deep waterway from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River at St. Louis. Though there is some rock cutting to be done, theproblem is not one of opening a new channel, but of improving a channel alreadyin existence. Through the Mississippi Eiver toward the Gulf the route of thewaterway is equally plain. Of the natural conditions of the route but one further point needs mention.It is the effect of the opening of such a channel upon the level of the waters ofLake Michigan. Objections on

. Memorial, presented by the Trustees of the Sanitary District of Chicago to the Congress of the United States : deep waterway from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River at St. Louis. Though there is some rock cutting to be done, theproblem is not one of opening a new channel, but of improving a channel alreadyin existence. Through the Mississippi Eiver toward the Gulf the route of thewaterway is equally plain. Of the natural conditions of the route but one further point needs mention.It is the effect of the opening of such a channel upon the level of the waters ofLake Michigan. Objections on Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AG3TC6

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7.1 MB (589 KB Compressed download)

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1228 x 2035 px | 20.8 x 34.5 cm | 8.2 x 13.6 inches | 150dpi

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. Memorial, presented by the Trustees of the Sanitary District of Chicago to the Congress of the United States : deep waterway from Lake Michigan to the Mississippi River at St. Louis. Though there is some rock cutting to be done, theproblem is not one of opening a new channel, but of improving a channel alreadyin existence. Through the Mississippi Eiver toward the Gulf the route of thewaterway is equally plain. Of the natural conditions of the route but one further point needs mention.It is the effect of the opening of such a channel upon the level of the waters ofLake Michigan. Objections on this score do not carry any weight. Engineersestimate that ten times the amount of water which will flow through the presentSanitary and Ship Canal when used to its full capacity, can be carried off fromLake Michigan without having any injurious effect upon the electric power nowdeveloped at Niagara Falls, providing only that the water supply of the lakeregion is properly conserved, as it may easily be. Full navigation for oceangoing vessels of large size could be established the whole distance to the Grulfwithout drawing anywhere nearly to this extent ujoon the lake waters.. Ill—THE DEEP WATERWAY POLICY OF THE STATE OE ILLINOIS: WITH A HISTORICAL SKETCH OF CANAL BUILDING BETWEEN LAKE MICHIGAN AND THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER. The policy of the State of lUmois has always been favorable to the establish-ment of communication by water between Lake Michigan and the MississippiEiver, and indeed, long before the state came into existence the predictions of ex-plorers and the desires of early settlers looked in the same direction. The stategave most sincere proof of the earnestness of its policy three-quarters of a cen-tury ago in the days of the tow-path and the canal boat, by the construction of theold fashioned Illinois and Michigan Canal connecting Chicago with the IllinoisEiver, and later by securing from Congress the construction of the Hennepin Canalconnecting the upper Illinois w

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