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Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . INI.AID I1M VINA. parted with the secret, but he was old and weary of life and proud to die for his king.Kalakaua was very eager, but the kahu then told him that the man who opened itwould die too. Not being weary of life, the king came to me and begged me to go andopen the puoa for him. I asked if he was anxious to kill me: and he answered (in thegeneral belief of his people) that the predicted fate had power only over Hawaiians.We went so far as to make an agreement as to the partition of the things that mightbe found, but the kings departure for

Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . INI.AID I1M VINA. parted with the secret, but he was old and weary of life and proud to die for his king.Kalakaua was very eager, but the kahu then told him that the man who opened itwould die too. Not being weary of life, the king came to me and begged me to go andopen the puoa for him. I asked if he was anxious to kill me: and he answered (in thegeneral belief of his people) that the predicted fate had power only over Hawaiians.We went so far as to make an agreement as to the partition of the things that mightbe found, but the kings departure for Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AN013Y

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7.1 MB (142.6 KB Compressed download)

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1662 x 1502 px | 28.1 x 25.4 cm | 11.1 x 10 inches | 150dpi

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Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . INI.AID I1M VINA. parted with the secret, but he was old and weary of life and proud to die for his king.Kalakaua was very eager, but the kahu then told him that the man who opened itwould die too. Not being weary of life, the king came to me and begged me to go andopen the puoa for him. I asked if he was anxious to kill me: and he answered (in thegeneral belief of his people) that the predicted fate had power only over Hawaiians.We went so far as to make an agreement as to the partition of the things that mightbe found, but the kings departure for the coast of California, where he died, put anend to the adventure, and the old kahu soon after died also. Although many of the objects in the Bishop Museum came from such deposits, invery few cases is the locality known. As an illustration of the care exercised by thekahu over his hidden treasures, I may mention a cave in Kan discovered by accident.Late one afternoon while the road from Kilauea to Punaluu was being broken out, a cart [174]. Old Hawaiian Carvings. T, crushed through into the cave beneath the roadway. It was found to contain many articles, but the day was so far spent when the workmen had extricated the cart and horses that they left further exploration for the next morning. They returned to work very early, but the cave was empty. Doubtless the kahu had removed the deposit from the opened cave to another in the neighborhood: eaves are common enough in that region. The Papa kupalupalu maun (two platters on which human flesh was used for shark bait) of Alapai nui (died 1754) were in a puoa in Puuanahulu, North Kona, , Hawaii, when the lava flow of 1868-69 threatened their destruction. The cave was buried in the advancing stream, but the platters were removed to the house of the kahu in Kaupulehu where they were preserved until April 8, 1883, when the last of the kahu, an old woman, died. They were then sold and came to the Museum, where they bear the numbers 157

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