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Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . FIG. 6. BACK VIEW OF ATJMAKU. io Old Hawaiian Carvings. carved figures, mostly grotesque, were doubtless hidden by the devout priests from themob violence that general^ accompanies such changes; witness the terrible destruc-tion of architectural statues, even tombs and painted glass in civilized countriesduring the reformation. But more important was the custom of depositing in somecache the especial property of a departed chief. Not by any means with his remainsto which they might serve for identification, a thing to be most carefully avoided, as.

Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . FIG. 6. BACK VIEW OF ATJMAKU. io Old Hawaiian Carvings. carved figures, mostly grotesque, were doubtless hidden by the devout priests from themob violence that general^ accompanies such changes; witness the terrible destruc-tion of architectural statues, even tombs and painted glass in civilized countriesduring the reformation. But more important was the custom of depositing in somecache the especial property of a departed chief. Not by any means with his remainsto which they might serve for identification, a thing to be most carefully avoided, as. Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AN03BC

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7.2 MB (227.6 KB Compressed download)

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1691 x 1478 px | 28.6 x 25 cm | 11.3 x 9.9 inches | 150dpi

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Memoirs of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum . FIG. 6. BACK VIEW OF ATJMAKU. io Old Hawaiian Carvings. carved figures, mostly grotesque, were doubtless hidden by the devout priests from themob violence that general^ accompanies such changes; witness the terrible destruc-tion of architectural statues, even tombs and painted glass in civilized countriesduring the reformation. But more important was the custom of depositing in somecache the especial property of a departed chief. Not by any means with his remainsto which they might serve for identification, a thing to be most carefully avoided, as. we shall see below, but in some cave (puoa ), possibly on another island from thatwhich concealed his bones, such deposits being left in the care of a kahu who wouldgenerally appoint his successors, and while in the early days of the Christian missionon these islands, the converted kahu would perhaps bring an idol from its place ofconcealment to serve as offering to bis new spiritual father and proof of the sincerityof his conversion,3 generally the secret of the place of deposit was faithfully kept.I have known of several traditionary caves of which the entrance was carefully con-cealed, and although the kahu was known, nothing would induce him (or her) to dis-close the secret. The war god of the great Kamehameha, Kukailimoku (Mus. No. 7855) figured in the essay on HawaiianFeather Work, Memoirs, vol. i, p. 32, li^. 22, was thus given t the missionary, and it is probable that the image ! .Mus. No. 7656) was a similar offering. [172] Old Hawaiian Carvings.

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