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. Master Rockafellar's voyage . ten as painis. Every night, stars which had become familiarto us were sinking in the south, and new constella-tions soaring out of the horizon over the bows.It was delightful to handle the ropes, and findthem supple as coir instead of stiff as iron bars,to pick up the sails, and feel them soft again tothe touch instead of that hardness of sheets of steelwhich they gathered to them in the frosty parallels.The sun shone with a warmth that was every dayincreasing in ardency ; the dry decks sparkledcrisply like the white firm sand of the sea-beach.The live-stock gre

. Master Rockafellar's voyage . ten as painis. Every night, stars which had become familiarto us were sinking in the south, and new constella-tions soaring out of the horizon over the bows.It was delightful to handle the ropes, and findthem supple as coir instead of stiff as iron bars,to pick up the sails, and feel them soft again tothe touch instead of that hardness of sheets of steelwhich they gathered to them in the frosty parallels.The sun shone with a warmth that was every dayincreasing in ardency ; the dry decks sparkledcrisply like the white firm sand of the sea-beach.The live-stock gre Stock Photo
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Reading Room 2020 / Alamy Stock Photo

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2CGWWBG

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996 x 2508 px | 8.4 x 21.2 cm | 3.3 x 8.4 inches | 300dpi

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. Master Rockafellar's voyage . ten as painis. Every night, stars which had become familiarto us were sinking in the south, and new constella-tions soaring out of the horizon over the bows.It was delightful to handle the ropes, and findthem supple as coir instead of stiff as iron bars,to pick up the sails, and feel them soft again tothe touch instead of that hardness of sheets of steelwhich they gathered to them in the frosty parallels.The sun shone with a warmth that was every dayincreasing in ardency ; the dry decks sparkledcrisply like the white firm sand of the sea-beach.The live-stock grew gay and hearty with the At-lantic temperature : the cocks crew cheerily, thehens cackled with vigour, the sheep bleated withvoices which filled our salted, weather-toughenedheads with visions of green meadows, of fieldsenamelled with daisies, of hedges full of nosegays,and of twinkling green branches melodious withbirds. We slipped into the south-east trade wind, andbore away for the equator under fore-topmast stud-ding-sail.. *! . . SAT RIDING A-COCK-HORSE OF IT (p. 231), HE SIGHTS A WRECK. 231 One moonlight night a fancy to view the shipfrom the bowsprit entered my mind. I went onto the forecastle and crawled out on to the jib-boom, and there sat riding a-cock-horse of it,holding by the outer jib-stay. The moon shonebrightly over the main-topsail yard-arm ; all sailwas on the ship, and she was leaning over fromthe fresh breeze like a yacht in a racing match.The moonlight made her decks resemble ivory,and stars of silver glory sparkled fitfully alongthem in the glass and brass work. The wholefigure of the noble fabric seemed to be rushingat me ; the foam poured like steam from her stemthat was smoking and sheering through the oceansurge. Over my head soared the great jibs, likethe wings of some mighty spirit. My heart leaptup in me to the rise and fall of the spar that Ijockeyed. It was like sitting at one end of aleviathan see-saw, and every upheaval was as ex-hilarating as