. Manual of the apiary. Bees. MANUAL OF THE APIAET. 17. Fig. 9. a, tongue, or ligvila; 6, labial imlpi; d, paraglossEe. comb, extend either vertically or diagonally downward, and much resemble a thimble or a pea-nut in form and size. The eggs are placed in-these cells, either by the worker bees, which transfer them from worker cells, or else by the queen. Some apiarists doubt that the queen ever places an egg in a queen cell, but I have no doubt of the fact, though I never witnessed the act. I have fre- quently seen the eggs in these cells in exactly the position which the queen always places

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. Manual of the apiary. Bees. MANUAL OF THE APIAET. 17. Fig. 9. a, tongue, or ligvila; 6, labial imlpi; d, paraglossEe. comb, extend either vertically or diagonally downward, and much resemble a thimble or a pea-nut in form and size. The eggs are placed in-these cells, either by the worker bees, which transfer them from worker cells, or else by the queen. Some apiarists doubt that the queen ever places an egg in a queen cell, but I have no doubt of the fact, though I never witnessed the act. I have fre- quently seen the eggs in these cells in exactly the position which the queen always places her eggs. 'Nor have I much respect for the arguments which are built on an inferred discord between the queen and neuters. I believe there is a better understanding between the inmates of the hive than is generally believed by apiarists. It is probably true that the actions of the bees are influenced and controlled by circumstances or conditions, but I have yet to see satisfactory proof that these conditions differently impress the queen and workers. The conditions which usually lead to the building of queen cells and the peopling of the same, are loss of queen, inability of queen to lay fertile eggs, and too great numbers of bees, or too little room in the hive, which is likely to be true in times of great honey secretion. The queen may be developed from an egg or from a worker larva less than three days old, which will then be transferred from a worker to a queen cell. The development of the queen is much the same as that of a worker, though she is fed richer and more plenteous food, called royal jelly. So abundant is this royal pabulum that there is always some remaining in the cell after the queen issues. It is probable that the more profuse and sumptuous diet, perhaps aided by a more ample habitation, is what accelerates and perfects the develojjment of her royal highness. Yet the fact of fertile workers, and the easy probability of their having received a little richer an