Manual of Egyptian archæology and guide to the study of antiquities in EgyptFor the use of students and travellers . 286 THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS. craftsmen when once exercised in this direction wasunbounded, and they adapted everything to theirpurpose—granite, diorite, breccia, pink jade, alabaster,. Fig. 242.—Black-topped pottery. a soft Hmestone adapted for fine work, and a materialeven more easily worked, namely, pottery paintedand glazed. Although the art of modelling, decorating, andfiring pottery was never carried to such perfection POTTERY 287 in Egypt as it was in Greece, it was not for th

Manual of Egyptian archæology and guide to the study of antiquities in EgyptFor the use of students and travellers . 286 THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS. craftsmen when once exercised in this direction wasunbounded, and they adapted everything to theirpurpose—granite, diorite, breccia, pink jade, alabaster,. Fig. 242.—Black-topped pottery. a soft Hmestone adapted for fine work, and a materialeven more easily worked, namely, pottery paintedand glazed. Although the art of modelling, decorating, andfiring pottery was never carried to such perfection POTTERY 287 in Egypt as it was in Greece, it was not for th Stock Photo
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Manual of Egyptian archæology and guide to the study of antiquities in EgyptFor the use of students and travellers . 286 THE INDUSTRIAL ARTS. craftsmen when once exercised in this direction wasunbounded, and they adapted everything to theirpurpose—granite, diorite, breccia, pink jade, alabaster, . Fig. 242.—Black-topped pottery. a soft Hmestone adapted for fine work, and a materialeven more easily worked, namely, pottery paintedand glazed. Although the art of modelling, decorating, andfiring pottery was never carried to such perfection POTTERY 287 in Egypt as it was in Greece, it was not for thewant of the crude material. The valley of the Nilesupplies a variety of fine ductile clays from whichgreat results might have been obtained had it beencarefully prepared, but in many cases the clay was ffM¥^

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