Manchester Royal Exchange Theatre, St Anns Square,Manchester,North West,England,UK, M2

Manchester Royal Exchange Theatre, St Anns Square,Manchester,North West,England,UK, M2 Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2ADR2D5

File size:

57.1 MB (2.5 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

5472 x 3648 px | 46.3 x 30.9 cm | 18.2 x 12.2 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

3 December 2019

Location:

St Ann's Square, Manchester,England,UK, M2 7DH

More information:

The Royal Exchange is a grade II listed building in Manchester, England. It is located in the city centre on the land bounded by St Ann's Square, Exchange Street, Market Street, Cross Street and Old Bank Street. The complex includes the Royal Exchange Theatre and the Royal Exchange Shopping Centre. The Royal Exchange was heavily damaged in the Manchester Blitz and in the 1996 Manchester bombing. The current building is the last of several buildings on the site used for commodities exchange, primarily but not exclusively of cotton and textiles. Thomas Harrison designed the new exchange of 1809 at the junction of Market Street and Exchange Street. Harrison designed the exchange in the Classical style. It had two storeys above a basement and was constructed in Runcorn stone The building remained empty until 1973 when it was used to house a theatre company (69 Theatre Company); the company performed in a temporary theatre but there were plans for a permanent theatre whose cost was then estimated at £400,000. The Royal Exchange Theatre was founded in 1976 by five artistic directors: Michael Elliott, Caspar Wrede, Richard Negri, James Maxwell and Braham Murray. It was opened by Laurence Olivier on 15 September 1976 The building was damaged on 15 June 1996 when an IRA bomb exploded in Corporation Street less than 50 yards away. The refurbished theatre re-opened on 30 November 1998 by Prince Edward. The opening production, Stanley Houghton's Hindle Wakes was the play that should have opened the day the bomb was exploded