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Liverpool FC Hillsborough Memorial, LFC,Liverpool Football Club, Anfield, Premier League, Merseyside,North West England, UK, L4 2UZ

Liverpool FC Hillsborough Memorial, LFC,Liverpool Football Club, Anfield, Premier League, Merseyside,North West England, UK, L4 2UZ Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

Tony Smith / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2CBTEFB

File size:

45.8 MB (2.9 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

4392 x 3648 px | 37.2 x 30.9 cm | 14.6 x 12.2 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

15 August 2020

Location:

Liverpool Football Club Anfield Road Liverpool, Merseyside,North West England,UK, L4 0TH

More information:

The Hillsborough disaster was a fatal human crush during a football match at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England, on 15 April 1989. It occurred during an FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest in the two standing-only central pens in the Leppings Lane stand allocated to Liverpool supporters. Shortly before kick-off, in an attempt to ease overcrowding outside the entrance turnstiles, the police match commander David Duckenfield ordered exit gate C opened, leading to an influx of even more supporters to the pens. This led to a crowding in the pens and the crush. With 96 fatalities and 766 injuries, it remains as of 2020 the worst disaster in British sporting history. Ninety-four people died on the day; another person died in hospital days later and the final victim, who had been put into a persistent vegetative state by the crush and had never regained consciousness, died in 1993. The match was abandoned but was restaged at Old Trafford in Manchester on 7 May 1989 with Liverpool winning and going on to win the FA Cup. In the following days and weeks police fed the press false stories suggesting that hooliganism and drunkenness by Liverpool supporters had caused the disaster. Blaming of Liverpool fans persisted even after the Taylor Report of 1990, which found that the main cause was a failure of control by South Yorkshire Police (SYP).[3Following the Taylor Report, the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) ruled there was no evidence to justify prosecution of any individuals or institutions. The disaster also led to a number of safety improvements in the largest English football grounds, notably the elimination of fenced standing terraces in favour of all-seater stadiums in the top two tiers of English football

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