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Literary by-paths in old England . , butspeechless; the watchman got assistance, andtook him to a house in the neighbourhood, wherehe died about 8 oclock. When this bereavement overtook Keats, hewas at Enfield, a pupil in the school of the Rev.John Clarke. It is many years now since thatbuilding was pulled down to make room for arailway station, but happily a portion of thestructure still survives, and is now illustratedfor the first time in connection with the poetscareer. Of the history of this house, CowdenClarke, the son of the master of the school, nar-rates that it had been built by a We

Literary by-paths in old England . , butspeechless; the watchman got assistance, andtook him to a house in the neighbourhood, wherehe died about 8 oclock. When this bereavement overtook Keats, hewas at Enfield, a pupil in the school of the Rev.John Clarke. It is many years now since thatbuilding was pulled down to make room for arailway station, but happily a portion of thestructure still survives, and is now illustratedfor the first time in connection with the poetscareer. Of the history of this house, CowdenClarke, the son of the master of the school, nar-rates that it had been built by a We Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AWJNRD

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7.2 MB (454.1 KB Compressed download)

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1431 x 1747 px | 24.2 x 29.6 cm | 9.5 x 11.6 inches | 150dpi

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Literary by-paths in old England . , butspeechless; the watchman got assistance, andtook him to a house in the neighbourhood, wherehe died about 8 oclock. When this bereavement overtook Keats, hewas at Enfield, a pupil in the school of the Rev.John Clarke. It is many years now since thatbuilding was pulled down to make room for arailway station, but happily a portion of thestructure still survives, and is now illustratedfor the first time in connection with the poetscareer. Of the history of this house, CowdenClarke, the son of the master of the school, nar-rates that it had been built by a West Indiamerchant in the latter end of the seventeenthor beginning of the eighteenth century. It wasof the better character of the domestic archi-tecture of that period, the whole front beingof the purest red brick, wrought by means ofmoulds into rich designs of flowers and pome-granates, with heads of cherubim over niches inthe centre of the building. Because it was suchan excellent example of the early Georgian216* IN OLD ENGLAND. Facade of Keatss Schoolhouse domestic architecture, and not because it formedpart of the building in which Keats was edu-cated, the facade of this Enfield schoolhouseescaped the usual fate of demolished bricksand mortar, and may now be seen in an annex 217 LITERARY BY-PATHS of the South Kensington Museum, London, amid a motley collection of ship models andbottled monstrosities. Perhaps the warning maybe offered that it will be idle for the pilgrimto question the museum authorities as to thewhereabouts of the schoolhouse of John Keats;they are, or were, ignorant that such a treasureis in their charge ; but if inquiry be made, as perthe catalogue, for the specimen of old Englishornamental brick work and carving from an oldhouse at Enfield, Middlesex, the seeker will indue time be rewarded by gazing upon at leasta portion of the building which is our earliestsurviving link with the life of Keats. It willbe seen how accurate and justifiable is CowdenClark

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