. Life of a Scotch naturalist: Thomas Edward, associate of the Linnaean Society. 310 The Loch of Spyrvie. [chap. xvii. sea-beach was neither more nor less than a veritable kitch- en-midden." The Rey. Dr. Gordon, of Bimie, near Elgin, had already found a similar accumulation of shells on the old margin of the Loch of Spynie, formerly an arm of the sea. The mound is situated in a small wood on the farm, of Brigzes.. SPTUIE OASTLE AND LOOH, It had been much diminished by its contents having been carted off from the centre of the heap, as manure or top- dressing for the adjoining fields. The

. Life of a Scotch naturalist: Thomas Edward, associate of the Linnaean Society. 310 The Loch of Spyrvie. [chap. xvii. sea-beach was neither more nor less than a veritable kitch- en-midden." The Rey. Dr. Gordon, of Bimie, near Elgin, had already found a similar accumulation of shells on the old margin of the Loch of Spynie, formerly an arm of the sea. The mound is situated in a small wood on the farm, of Brigzes.. SPTUIE OASTLE AND LOOH, It had been much diminished by its contents having been carted off from the centre of the heap, as manure or top- dressing for the adjoining fields. The  Stock Photo
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. Life of a Scotch naturalist: Thomas Edward, associate of the Linnaean Society. 310 The Loch of Spyrvie. [chap. xvii. sea-beach was neither more nor less than a veritable kitch- en-midden." The Rey. Dr. Gordon, of Bimie, near Elgin, had already found a similar accumulation of shells on the old margin of the Loch of Spynie, formerly an arm of the sea. The mound is situated in a small wood on the farm, of Brigzes.. SPTUIE OASTLE AND LOOH, It had been much diminished by its contents having been carted off from the centre of the heap, as manure or top- dressing for the adjoining fields. The mound—or rather couple of mounds, for it has been cut into two parts—must have been of considerable extent. It measured about a hundred yards in length by about thirty in breadth. The most abundant shell found was the periwinkle, or the edi- ble " buckie," as it is usually called. Next in order was the oyster; and magnificent natives they must have been. The Bay of Spynie was then a productive dredging-ground. On the extensive flat around it, wherever a canal or ditch is dug up, the shells of oysters are yet to be met with, seem-. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Smiles, Samuel, 1812-1904; Edward, Thomas, 1814-1886. New York, Harper & brothers