Lectures on operative dental surgery and therapeutics . ny particular in-strument, fails to respond in as ready a manner to anyother. Of the materials from which you may select, are lead,steel, wood, tin, rubber, &c. Of some of these, and of thedifferent forms of mallet, I have already spoken. The manner of holding the mallet is one of the importantfeatures connected with its use, and requires to be particu-larly studied. The handle should rest loosely between thethumb and index finger, assisted by the second finger, and 38 its retention be quite independent of any other portion ofthe hand. Wi

Lectures on operative dental surgery and therapeutics . ny particular in-strument, fails to respond in as ready a manner to anyother. Of the materials from which you may select, are lead,steel, wood, tin, rubber, &c. Of some of these, and of thedifferent forms of mallet, I have already spoken. The manner of holding the mallet is one of the importantfeatures connected with its use, and requires to be particu-larly studied. The handle should rest loosely between thethumb and index finger, assisted by the second finger, and 38 its retention be quite independent of any other portion ofthe hand. Wi Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AM49M5

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1381 x 1810 px | 23.4 x 30.6 cm | 9.2 x 12.1 inches | 150dpi

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Lectures on operative dental surgery and therapeutics . ny particular in-strument, fails to respond in as ready a manner to anyother. Of the materials from which you may select, are lead, steel, wood, tin, rubber, &c. Of some of these, and of thedifferent forms of mallet, I have already spoken. The manner of holding the mallet is one of the importantfeatures connected with its use, and requires to be particu-larly studied. The handle should rest loosely between thethumb and index finger, assisted by the second finger, and 38 its retention be quite independent of any other portion ofthe hand. With each stroke of the mallet, the handle shouldcome in contact with the palm of the hand, before reachingthe instrument, thereby partially arresting the blow, pre-paratory to its return. I would not have you forget thatthe impetus to the stroke must be given from the wrist andhand only. To illustrate this, I have had the followingcut made, which is intended to represent one of the positionsof the mallet previous to its descent upon the instrument.. Fig. 9. There is, however, no arbitrary or stereotyped rule bywhich you can be governed in the use of the hand mallet;and the above illustration is only intended to convey anidea of the light and easy manner of holding, as an absenceof all muscular rigidity of the hand is required while usingit; further than this, the execution becomes simply a ques-tion of time and practice. With this, as with all other in-struments used in operating about the mouth, the studyshould be to attain a delicacy of touch that may beperceptible to your patients; for a heavy hand in den-tistry is much to be dreaded. 39 It now becomes necessary to consider the instrumentsbest adapted for introducing gold into cavities. Thoseilkistrated in Fig. 10 fulfil the requirements of all myordinary work, and much that is more difficult.

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