Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . rietal convolution, andextending to the superior extremity of the ascending frontalconvolution, is the motor centre of the upper limbs. LOCALIZATION IN CEREBRAL DISEASES. II Sphenoidal Lobe.—The situation of the sphenoidal lobe iseasily understood. Upon the convex face of the hemisphereit is bounded by the lower border of the hemisphere and bythe fissure of Sylvius. The parallel fissure, called thusbecause it is parallel to the fissure of Sylvius, divides the lobeinto two parts. In the uppe

Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . rietal convolution, andextending to the superior extremity of the ascending frontalconvolution, is the motor centre of the upper limbs. LOCALIZATION IN CEREBRAL DISEASES. II Sphenoidal Lobe.—The situation of the sphenoidal lobe iseasily understood. Upon the convex face of the hemisphereit is bounded by the lower border of the hemisphere and bythe fissure of Sylvius. The parallel fissure, called thusbecause it is parallel to the fissure of Sylvius, divides the lobeinto two parts. In the uppe Stock Photo
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Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . rietal convolution, andextending to the superior extremity of the ascending frontalconvolution, is the motor centre of the upper limbs. LOCALIZATION IN CEREBRAL DISEASES. II Sphenoidal Lobe.—The situation of the sphenoidal lobe iseasily understood. Upon the convex face of the hemisphereit is bounded by the lower border of the hemisphere and bythe fissure of Sylvius. The parallel fissure, called thusbecause it is parallel to the fissure of Sylvius, divides the lobeinto two parts. In the upper part is found the marginal con-volution, and at the posterior end of the fissure, the gyrusangularis, the removal of which Ferrier says produces tem-porary blindness of the opposite eye. Occipital Lobe.—A transverse furrow separates this lobeinto two parts. For the present there is nothing special tobe said of it. After this brief survey of the cerebral convolutions in themonkey, the corresponding ones in man become more sim- Sup. pnetl J/ibuIe, 2Jis^, of, Ro]ando, , ?parietal ^(.fissure»- *«. Essure of Sylvia; Paralldfissuie. Fig. 3.—Convex surface of a hemisphere of the human brain (parietal lobe partlyschematic.) plified, as proved by the recapitulation which I will nowgive, using for that purpose a plate from Fovilles beautifulwork (Fig. 3). You observe that the fissure of Sylvius and the fissure ofRolando furnish the inferior and posterior borders of the 12 DISEASES OF THE BRAIN. frontal lobe, in which lobe you may notice the ascendingfrontal (or anterior parietal) convolution and the first, secondand third frontal convolutions. (Fig. 3.) The parieto-occipital fissure, on account of its overlyingfolds {flis de passage), affords but a confused separationbetween the occipital, parietal, and sphenoidal lobes. Back of the fissure of Rolando, between that and the inter-parietal fissure, is the ascending parietal convolution ; aboveand back of the interparietal fissure

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