Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . cipal branches : the first nour-ishes the two inferior frontal convolutions ; the second, muchmore important, is distributed (less commonly than theSylvian, but much oftener than the anterior cerebral) to thegyrus fornicatus (Fig. 16), to the corpus callosum, to thefirst frontal convolution (internal and external faces), to theparacentral lobule and upon the convex face of the frontallobe, to the first and second frontal convolutions (Fig. 17),and finally to the superior extremity of the as

Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . cipal branches : the first nour-ishes the two inferior frontal convolutions ; the second, muchmore important, is distributed (less commonly than theSylvian, but much oftener than the anterior cerebral) to thegyrus fornicatus (Fig. 16), to the corpus callosum, to thefirst frontal convolution (internal and external faces), to theparacentral lobule and upon the convex face of the frontallobe, to the first and second frontal convolutions (Fig. 17),and finally to the superior extremity of the as Stock Photo
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Lectures on localization in diseases of the brain, delivered at the Faculté de médecine, Paris, 1875 . cipal branches : the first nour-ishes the two inferior frontal convolutions ; the second, muchmore important, is distributed (less commonly than theSylvian, but much oftener than the anterior cerebral) to thegyrus fornicatus (Fig. 16), to the corpus callosum, to thefirst frontal convolution (internal and external faces), to theparacentral lobule and upon the convex face of the frontallobe, to the first and second frontal convolutions (Fig. 17), and finally to the superior extremity of the ascending frontalconvolution. The third branch of the anterior cerebral arteryis sent to the quadrilateral lobule, which may be subject tolesions on its own account, as I have just now given you anexample. 58 DISEASES OF THE BRAIN. IV. The posterior cerebral artery (Figs. 12, 16, and 17)often suffers alterations by embolismus and thrombus. Ischsemic softenings of the posterior lobes are much morecommon than with the anterior lobes. The territory of this artery is divided into three secondary e^I^^f*^^. Fig. 17.—Vascular territories of the inferior face of the human brain, indicated bythe dotted lines. • departments, corresponding to three arteries of the secondorder. The first of these goes to the gyrus angularis; thesecond to the inferior part of the sphenoidal lobe, embracingthe inferior sphenoidal convolution and the fusiform lobule ;the third goes to the lingual lobule, to the cuneus, and theoccipital lobe proper. SEVENTH LECTURE. CIRCULATION IN THE CENTRAL MASSES (GRAY GANGLIAAND THE INTERNAL CAPSULE). Snmmarjr ;—Arterial Clrciilation In the Gray Central Ganglia ; Intra- Knvcpllallc Hemorrhage.—Anatomico-Patliological Differences he-t^ween the Peripheral and Central Parts of the Brain.—Relati-ve In-frequency of Cerebral Hemorrhage in the Peripheral Regions; itsFrequency in the Central Parts.—Origin o€ the Arteries of the Cen-tral System.—Terminal Arteries ;

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