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Labrador: its discovery, exploration, and development . gone under in the fightfor existence. His endeavour has been always to avoidpauperizing those whom he assists, and therefore he hasrequired that some work, or service of some kind, shallbe given in return. In many cases the benefit has beenpermanent, in others the withdrawal of help wouldmean a relapse into poverty. A great deal has been said and written about thesupplying system. It is certain that the system is evil,equally bad for both supplier and supplied. On theone hand it leads to rapacity and extortion, and onthe other to dishones

Labrador: its discovery, exploration, and development . gone under in the fightfor existence. His endeavour has been always to avoidpauperizing those whom he assists, and therefore he hasrequired that some work, or service of some kind, shallbe given in return. In many cases the benefit has beenpermanent, in others the withdrawal of help wouldmean a relapse into poverty. A great deal has been said and written about thesupplying system. It is certain that the system is evil,equally bad for both supplier and supplied. On theone hand it leads to rapacity and extortion, and onthe other to dishones Stock Photo
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Contributor:

The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

2AKHN8F

File size:

7.1 MB (0.3 MB Compressed download)

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Model - no | Property - noDo I need a release?

Dimensions:

2426 x 1030 px | 41.1 x 17.4 cm | 16.2 x 6.9 inches | 150dpi

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Labrador: its discovery, exploration, and development . gone under in the fightfor existence. His endeavour has been always to avoidpauperizing those whom he assists, and therefore he hasrequired that some work, or service of some kind, shallbe given in return. In many cases the benefit has beenpermanent, in others the withdrawal of help wouldmean a relapse into poverty. A great deal has been said and written about thesupplying system. It is certain that the system is evil,equally bad for both supplier and supplied. On theone hand it leads to rapacity and extortion, and onthe other to dishonesty and robbery. But a wrong aspecthas been given to this unhappy business by the greatmajority of modern writers. The supplying merchanthas been pictured as a voracious octopus, endeavouringto get the unhappy fishermen into his toils. This is farfrom being the correct view of the situation. It isimpossible to carry on such an uncertain businessas the fishery without a large amount of credit beinggiven ; but in the usual course the pressure comes from. pete LINDSAY, VOLUNTEER IX CHARGE OFREINDEER EXPERIMENT