. Key to North American birds. Containing a concise account of every species of living and fossil bird at present known from the continent north of the Mexican and United States boundary, inclusive of Greenland and lower California, with which are incorporated General ornithology: an outline of the structure and classification of birds; and Field ornithology, a manual of collecting, preparing, and preserving birds. Birds; Birds; 1887. PHALACMOCOBACIBJE: COBMOBANTS. 731 OS uiidnatum, a peculiar skull-bone occurring in nearly aU the petrels, the turacous {Musopha- gidm), and many cuckoos; and he

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Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PFYK5R
. Key to North American birds. Containing a concise account of every species of living and fossil bird at present known from the continent north of the Mexican and United States boundary, inclusive of Greenland and lower California, with which are incorporated General ornithology: an outline of the structure and classification of birds; and Field ornithology, a manual of collecting, preparing, and preserving birds. Birds; Birds; 1887. PHALACMOCOBACIBJE: COBMOBANTS. 731 OS uiidnatum, a peculiar skull-bone occurring in nearly aU the petrels, the turacous {Musopha- gidm), and many cuckoos; and here only the stomach develops no pyloric cavity. Cuica 2, but very small. Sternum very broad for its length, the furculum firmly anchylosed, the poste- rior border entire. The femoro-caudal and ambiens are present; the accessory femoro-caudal, semitendinosus, and its accessory are absent. The frigates are maritime and pelagic birds of most warm parts of the globe. Their general contour is unique among water-birds, in the immense length and sweep of the wings, length of the forked tail and extreme smallness of the feet. In command of wing they are unsurpassed, and but few birds approach them in this respect. They are more nearly independent of land than any other birds excepting albatrosses and petrels, being often seen hundreds of miles at sea, and delight to soar at an astonishing elevation. They cannot dive, and scarcely swim or walk; food is procured by dashing dowu on wing with unerring aim, and by harassing gulls, terns, and other less active or weaker birds until they are forced to disgorge or drop their prey. Their habit is gregarious, especially during the breecUng season, when thousands congregate to nest in low thick bushes by the water's edge. The nest is a shallow flat structure of sticks; the eggs, two or three in number, are greenish-white with a thick smooth shell. " The young are covered with yel- lowish-white down, and look at first as if they had no feet.

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