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John Taylor (1578-1653), born in Gloucester, was an English poet who dubbed himself "The Water Poet" having spent much of his life as a Thames waterman, a member of the guild of boatmen that ferried passengers across the River Thames in Londons. Fancying himself as a poet, in 1630 he published a collection of over 150 poems. None of the poems are very good, but reveal of the life and times of people in the early modern period. He was well-enough known to gain the support of King Charles 1 when he campaigned against the pollution and hindrances to navigation of some of England’s rivers.

John Taylor (1578-1653), born in Gloucester, was an English poet who dubbed himself "The Water Poet" having spent much of his life as a Thames waterman, a member of the guild of boatmen that ferried passengers across the River Thames in Londons. Fancying himself as a poet, in 1630 he published a collection of over 150 poems. None of the poems are very good, but reveal of the life and times of people in the early modern period. He was well-enough known to gain the support of King Charles 1 when he campaigned against the pollution and hindrances to navigation of some of England’s rivers. Stock Photo
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Image details

Contributor:

De Luan / Alamy Stock Photo

Image ID:

PX76XE

File size:

35.7 MB (1.6 MB Compressed download)

Releases:

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Dimensions:

3120 x 4003 px | 26.4 x 33.9 cm | 10.4 x 13.3 inches | 300dpi

Date taken:

12 October 2018

Location:

England

More information:

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This image could have imperfections as it’s either historical or reportage.

John Taylor (1578-1653), born in Gloucester, was an English poet who dubbed himself "The Water Poet" having spent much of his life as a Thames waterman, a member of the guild of boatmen that ferried passengers across the River Thames in London, in the days when the London Bridge was the only passage between the banks. Fancying himself as a poet, by 1630 he was able to publish a magnificent collection of his works, over 150 poems. None of the poems are very good, but they are studied for what they reveal of the life and times of people in the early modern period. He was well-enough known to be able to draw attention to pet subjects: he gained the support of King Charles 1 when he campaigned against the pollution and hindrances to navigation of some of England’s rivers.

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