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. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. DICHOCARPISM 67 the surface of the tubercle, recipients from which escape for some time waves either of pure spermatia or of spermatia mixed with stylospores. Both are ovoid, but the spermatia are uncoloured and much smaller than the stylospores, which are as black as the spores of a Melanconium. These two quotations are given as exhibiting what we have called Dicho- carpism as it was presented to the view of one who accomplished very much in demonstrating the fact that

. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. DICHOCARPISM 67 the surface of the tubercle, recipients from which escape for some time waves either of pure spermatia or of spermatia mixed with stylospores. Both are ovoid, but the spermatia are uncoloured and much smaller than the stylospores, which are as black as the spores of a Melanconium. These two quotations are given as exhibiting what we have called Dicho- carpism as it was presented to the view of one who accomplished very much in demonstrating the fact that Stock Photo
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. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. DICHOCARPISM 67 the surface of the tubercle, recipients from which escape for some time waves either of pure spermatia or of spermatia mixed with stylospores. Both are ovoid, but the spermatia are uncoloured and much smaller than the stylospores, which are as black as the spores of a Melanconium. These two quotations are given as exhibiting what we have called Dicho- carpism as it was presented to the view of one who accomplished very much in demonstrating the fact that the same species of Fungus is capable of developing reproductive bodies of more than one type or form. Our next example shall be found on a dead twig of birch, bursting through the bark in black pustules almost as large as a rape seed, or rather, oozing out in wet weather like thick black ink. Examined more closely, a mycelium will be found at the base forming a compact spore- bed, on which the brown elliptical sporules grow on short sporophores closely packed together. When mature these separate from their sporophores, and ooze from the apex of the pustule in an inky mass. In this condition it is called Melanconium oicolor. Later in the season the same pustules will be found occupied by a cluster of perithecia, perhaps six or eight, placed almost in a circle, with rather long necks (Fig. 42). Internally these perithecia contain numerous asci closely packed together, each ascus con- taining eight sporidia, of an elliptical shape, divided across the centre into two cells, and known as Melanconis stilbostoma, one of the compound Sphaeriacei of which the Melanconium bore the naked conidia, so that we have the same stroma yielding naked stylospores, and afterwards sporidia enclosed in asci. An endless variety might be adduced of ascosporous Sphaeriacei having also a preceding crop of stylospores on the same mycelium. Here we may cite two examples of another kind which are describe