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. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. CHAPTEK III THE CAEPOPHORE1 The mycelium, in all its forms and variations, is but the prelude and preparation for the development of such parts or organs as may be necessary for the subsequent processes of reproduction. The production of the carpophore is, in itself, only a continuation of the process of vegetation, but that vegetation is no longer subterranean, subcuticular, or creeping; invariably it is more or less, in development, at right angles to the mycelium, an

. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. CHAPTEK III THE CAEPOPHORE1 The mycelium, in all its forms and variations, is but the prelude and preparation for the development of such parts or organs as may be necessary for the subsequent processes of reproduction. The production of the carpophore is, in itself, only a continuation of the process of vegetation, but that vegetation is no longer subterranean, subcuticular, or creeping; invariably it is more or less, in development, at right angles to the mycelium, an Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDXHFY

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7.1 MB (0.2 MB Compressed download)

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1277 x 1957 px | 21.6 x 33.1 cm | 8.5 x 13 inches | 150dpi

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. Introduction to the study of fungi; their organography, classification, and distribution, for the use of collectors. Fungi. CHAPTEK III THE CAEPOPHORE1 The mycelium, in all its forms and variations, is but the prelude and preparation for the development of such parts or organs as may be necessary for the subsequent processes of reproduction. The production of the carpophore is, in itself, only a continuation of the process of vegetation, but that vegetation is no longer subterranean, subcuticular, or creeping; invariably it is more or less, in development, at right angles to the mycelium, and may be accomplished by the production of special erect branches, or a stem compounded of an indefinite number of erect threads, agglutinated and consolidated together; whether it is to be the conidiophore of a mould, the stroma of a Oordyceps, the club of a Geoglossum, or the stalk of an Agaric or Boletus, it is the fruit-bearer, or carpophore, which is destined to bear the fructification of Fig. 7.—Unbranched the species. It may be reduced to its lowest carpophore of terms, and be practically obsolete, so that the Rhopalomyces. ., ., receptacle is sessile, or nearly sessile, upon the mycelium; still there is normally and technically a carpophore, which supports the organs of reproduction. In the larger moulds generally the ascending hyphae are branches of the mycelium, and do not alter much in character except in being rather thicker and with more rigid walls, so as to maintain an erect position. These erect threads are in most cases clustered together, and are modified in ramification 1 The term " carpophore," in its special sense, is usually restricted to forms of a distinct fruit, consisting of an aggregate of reproduotiye organs.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Cooke, M. C