. Introduction to botany. Botany. Mosses, Ferns, and Horsetails. 291 the time of its maturity; that is, until the capsule contain- ing the ripened asexual spores has been formed at its apex. The asexual spores are capable of germination as soon as formed, but, instead of producing a leafy moss plant imme- diately, they first form filamentous outgrowths called pro- tonemata, resembling the filamentous Algae (Fig. 152, A and B). Finally buds (Fig. 152, B) are formed on the protonemata, which develop into the leafy moss plant.. Fig. 152. A, germinating moss spore; B, protonema produced by further

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. Introduction to botany. Botany. Mosses, Ferns, and Horsetails. 291 the time of its maturity; that is, until the capsule contain- ing the ripened asexual spores has been formed at its apex. The asexual spores are capable of germination as soon as formed, but, instead of producing a leafy moss plant imme- diately, they first form filamentous outgrowths called pro- tonemata, resembling the filamentous Algae (Fig. 152, A and B). Finally buds (Fig. 152, B) are formed on the protonemata, which develop into the leafy moss plant.. Fig. 152. A, germinating moss spore; B, protonema produced by further
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. Introduction to botany. Botany. Mosses, Ferns, and Horsetails. 291 the time of its maturity; that is, until the capsule contain- ing the ripened asexual spores has been formed at its apex. The asexual spores are capable of germination as soon as formed, but, instead of producing a leafy moss plant imme- diately, they first form filamentous outgrowths called pro- tonemata, resembling the filamentous Algae (Fig. 152, A and B). Finally buds (Fig. 152, B) are formed on the protonemata, which develop into the leafy moss plant.. Fig. 152. A, germinating moss spore; B, protonema produced by further development of A, To the left, near the base, is a bud which is to become a moss plant. After Sachs. The life history of a moss exhibits an alternation of two sorts of generations; the leaf-bearing generation, with its archegonia and antheridia, known as the sexual generation, or gametophyte, and the leafless asexual generation, or sporophyte, namely, the capsule and its stalk, which grows from the fertilized egg in the archegonium and produces spores asexually. It should be observed that the asexual generation in its young state bears chlorophyll, and must therefore be able to manufacture a portion of its food, at least for a time. 178. Dissemination of Spores. — It will be seen that after the top, or operculum (Fig. 150, O), of the sporangium has. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Stevens, William Chase, 1861-. Boston, D. C. Heath & Co.

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