. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BLOW-FLY 141 the under side of the head, in which the proboscis can be folded up. Hold the fly between the finger and thumb, and while observing it with the lens, press gently on the sides of the head. The proboscis will then be protruded, owing to distension by air. Note the inflation of the basal parts, the movements of the maxillary palps, and the action of the joints. The proboscis consists of a basal part (rostrum), which represents the fore

. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BLOW-FLY 141 the under side of the head, in which the proboscis can be folded up. Hold the fly between the finger and thumb, and while observing it with the lens, press gently on the sides of the head. The proboscis will then be protruded, owing to distension by air. Note the inflation of the basal parts, the movements of the maxillary palps, and the action of the joints. The proboscis consists of a basal part (rostrum), which represents the fore  Stock Photo
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The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo

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RDHHN7

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7.1 MB (214.9 KB Compressed download)

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1955 x 1278 px | 33.1 x 21.6 cm | 13 x 8.5 inches | 150dpi

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. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. THE STRUCTURE OF THE BLOW-FLY 141 the under side of the head, in which the proboscis can be folded up. Hold the fly between the finger and thumb, and while observing it with the lens, press gently on the sides of the head. The proboscis will then be protruded, owing to distension by air. Note the inflation of the basal parts, the movements of the maxillary palps, and the action of the joints. The proboscis consists of a basal part (rostrum), which represents the fore part of the head, and the mouth-parts. At the junction of these two divisions of the proboscis will be seen the maxillary palps, two curved, black, single-jointed rods, covered with hairs, very unlike the long three-or-four- jointed palps of a Nemoceran fly (see p. 131). Be- yond these is the labium, a thick and jointed hol- low tube, ending in an oval palette, which forms the rasping surface, while the tube is used for suction. The upper surface ^.^ So.-Female blow-fly, dorsal view. X 3- of the labium is grooved, ' and upon it lies a stiff, dark-coloured rod (the labrum) shaped like a long and veiy narrow steel pen; the labrum is partly overlapped by the sides of the labium. In Dipterous flies with piercing mouth-parts the labrum can be raised by the insect at pleasure, when the piercing imple- ments within are exposed; but in the blow-fly the labrum is never raised, and there is only a single needle within it, which is quite harmless. The palette at the tip of the labium consists of two lobes, sometimes called the labellse. Extend the proboscis by pressure on the sides of the head, and then cut it off with a pair of fine scissors, as near the base as possible. Mount it in glycerine, and examine with a low power of the microscope. A permanent preparation may be made by treating the proboscis with caustic potash solution.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned

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