. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. ii6 INJURIOUS AND USEFUL INSECTS perienced .observer. While studying the floating pupa with a lens he will see a commotion in the object, and before he has had time to realise what is going on, the fly is off and away. Examination of the cast skin teaches us that the pupal skin cracks lengthwise along the thorax, and that the fly emerges. Fig. 64.—Female fly of Chironomus dursalis. X 8. here, drawing its head backwards, its legs upwards, and its abdomen forwards to th

- Image ID: PG42GB
. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. ii6 INJURIOUS AND USEFUL INSECTS perienced .observer. While studying the floating pupa with a lens he will see a commotion in the object, and before he has had time to realise what is going on, the fly is off and away. Examination of the cast skin teaches us that the pupal skin cracks lengthwise along the thorax, and that the fly emerges. Fig. 64.—Female fly of Chironomus dursalis. X 8. here, drawing its head backwards, its legs upwards, and its abdomen forwards to th
Central Historic Books / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: PG42GB
. Injurious and useful insects; an introduction to the study of economic entomology. Insects; Beneficial insects; Insect pests. ii6 INJURIOUS AND USEFUL INSECTS perienced .observer. While studying the floating pupa with a lens he will see a commotion in the object, and before he has had time to realise what is going on, the fly is off and away. Examination of the cast skin teaches us that the pupal skin cracks lengthwise along the thorax, and that the fly emerges. Fig. 64.—Female fly of Chironomus dursalis. X 8. here, drawing its head backwards, its legs upwards, and its abdomen forwards to this one slit. The cast skin fills with air as the body is withdrawn, and forms a float upon which the fly can rest for a time if so disposed. By attentive examina- tion the top of the back of the fly can be seen to protrude for a minute or two just before the insect escapes, and I imagine that at this time the legs, feelers, and other tight-fitting parts are loosened from their sheaths. It is curious to see the fly,. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Miall, Louis Compton, 1842-. London, G. Bell & sons

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