Injuries and diseases of the jaws . e temporal muscle, and are quite below, andscarcely ever touch the malar bone. The capsular ligamentis tense, but not ruptured; the external lateral ligament is jltense, and passes from behind forwards instead of from be-fore backwards; the internal lateral and stylo-maxillaryligaments are stretched, and this is increased by raising thechin. The inter-articular fibro-cartilages are attached toand follow the motions of tlie condyles. According toMaisonneuve, the temporal muscles are only stretched; butWeber says that some of the fibres are usually torn oflP t

Injuries and diseases of the jaws . e temporal muscle, and are quite below, andscarcely ever touch the malar bone. The capsular ligamentis tense, but not ruptured; the external lateral ligament is jltense, and passes from behind forwards instead of from be-fore backwards; the internal lateral and stylo-maxillaryligaments are stretched, and this is increased by raising thechin. The inter-articular fibro-cartilages are attached toand follow the motions of tlie condyles. According toMaisonneuve, the temporal muscles are only stretched; butWeber says that some of the fibres are usually torn oflP t Stock Photo
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2AXKADA

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1404 x 1780 px | 23.8 x 30.1 cm | 9.4 x 11.9 inches | 150dpi

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Injuries and diseases of the jaws . e temporal muscle, and are quite below, andscarcely ever touch the malar bone. The capsular ligamentis tense, but not ruptured; the external lateral ligament is jltense, and passes from behind forwards instead of from be-fore backwards; the internal lateral and stylo-maxillaryligaments are stretched, and this is increased by raising thechin. The inter-articular fibro-cartilages are attached toand follow the motions of tlie condyles. According toMaisonneuve, the temporal muscles are only stretched; butWeber says that some of the fibres are usually torn oflP thecoronoid process. The fixation of the dislocated jaw has received a differentexplanation, and has been attributed to the catching of thecoronoid process against the malar bone, or the malar pro-cess of the superior maxilla. This view was originally main-tained by Fabricius ab Aquapendente, by Monro, and morerecently by Nelatou {Revue Medico-Chiriirgicale, tom. vi.), who is followed by Malgaigne in his treatise on Disloca- Fig. 36.. tions (1855). Nelaton maintains that in his experimentson the dead body, he constantly found the coronoid process MECHANISM OF DISLOCATION. 83 fixed against the malar boue; and he appeals also to aunique preparation of a pathological dislocation which hedissected and presented to the Musee Dupuytren. Theaccompanying illustration (fig. 36), reduced from Malgaigne^sAtlas, is from the preparation in question. The coronoidprocess in this certainly touches the malar bone, and therelations of the inter-articular cartilage and external lateralligament are well seen. Ribes and Monteggia agree withMaisonneuve and Weber in believing that in most jaws thecoronoid process is not long enough to reach the malarbone; and the last-named author mentions that Roser wasunable to reduce an old dislocation of eight weeks^ standing, even after cutting through both coronoid processes fromwithin the mouth by means of bone forceps. From experiments I have myself instituted,

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