Indian forest insects of economic importance Coleoptera . arva, how the grub feeds upon the beetle-larva,whether the latter is usually killed before making its calcareous covering tothe pupal chamber, how the fly leaves the tree, and the number of generationsof the insect in the year, are some of the points requiring investigation. Bothrideres? sp. (p. 112)—The grub of this beetle apparently feeds uponthe Hoplocerambyx grub as an external or internal parasite, eventually killingthe latter before it pupates. Cocoon.—The cocoon consists of a yellowish-coloured parchment material which appearsto

Indian forest insects of economic importance Coleoptera . arva, how the grub feeds upon the beetle-larva,whether the latter is usually killed before making its calcareous covering tothe pupal chamber, how the fly leaves the tree, and the number of generationsof the insect in the year, are some of the points requiring investigation. Bothrideres? sp. (p. 112)—The grub of this beetle apparently feeds uponthe Hoplocerambyx grub as an external or internal parasite, eventually killingthe latter before it pupates. Cocoon.—The cocoon consists of a yellowish-coloured parchment material which appearsto Stock Photo
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The Reading Room / Alamy Stock Photo

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2AJHT5R

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1409 x 1772 px | 23.9 x 30 cm | 9.4 x 11.8 inches | 150dpi

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Indian forest insects of economic importance Coleoptera . arva, how the grub feeds upon the beetle-larva, whether the latter is usually killed before making its calcareous covering tothe pupal chamber, how the fly leaves the tree, and the number of generationsof the insect in the year, are some of the points requiring investigation. Bothrideres? sp. (p. 112)—The grub of this beetle apparently feeds uponthe Hoplocerambyx grub as an external or internal parasite, eventually killingthe latter before it pupates. Cocoon.—The cocoon consists of a yellowish-coloured parchment material which appearsto be made of very closely spun fine fibres of a ligneous nature. It is elliptical in shapeand 4.2 mm. in length. The cover was spun with a fewfine silk threads to the shrivelled skin of the cerambyxlarva. Beetle.—Elongate, narrow, reddish brown in colour.Thorax square, anterior margin concave, disk convex, punctate. Elytra moderately convex, punctate-striate.Length, 5.8 mm. Fig. 221 shows cocoon, beetle, and ashrivelled skin of a Hoplocerambyx larva.. FIG. 221. Life History.— In a larval gallery of H.spinicornis, opened out whilst splitting up agreen sal-tree felled in the Kachugaon forestson 16 May 1906, a blackish shrivelled skin ofthe grub of this beetle was found. The larvahad been engaged in eating out the gallery inthe heart-wood which finally terminates in the pupal chamber, and had died from exhaus- Bothrideres ? sp. Cocoon and , . beetle. Shrivelled skin of Hoplo- tion whilst performing this operation. Beside cerambyxavr* (on the left) fromthe shrivelled skin was the small elliptical which the beetle was bred. Assam.cocoon described above. Both skin and cocoon were transferred to a tube and kept under observation. Anexamination of the tube on 19 May disclosed the fact that one-halfof the cocoon had been eaten down longitudinally, a reddish-colouredbeetle being observable inside. No material change occurred on the 2Oth.On the 2ist an inspection showed that the bee

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