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. How to make the garden pay [microform]. Gardening. X58—How to Make the Garden Pay. back of hoe. A few radish seeds might also be scattered along the rows with the beet seed. The radishes will better indicate the rows, so that we can begin to cultivate a few days after sow- ing. The radishes may be pulled up when of table or market- able size. Cultivation.—Prompt action is the all important point. Weeds should never be allowed to crowd. Cultivate with a narrow-bladed horse-hoe or cultivator; hoe as often as needed, and while the plants are young, run the hand wheel-hoe astraddle the rows, to

. How to make the garden pay [microform]. Gardening. X58—How to Make the Garden Pay. back of hoe. A few radish seeds might also be scattered along the rows with the beet seed. The radishes will better indicate the rows, so that we can begin to cultivate a few days after sow- ing. The radishes may be pulled up when of table or market- able size. Cultivation.—Prompt action is the all important point. Weeds should never be allowed to crowd. Cultivate with a narrow-bladed horse-hoe or cultivator; hoe as often as needed, and while the plants are young, run the hand wheel-hoe astraddle the rows, to  Stock Photo
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Library Book Collection / Alamy Stock Photo

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RPDJ98

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1073 x 2329 px | 18.2 x 39.4 cm | 7.2 x 15.5 inches | 150dpi

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. How to make the garden pay [microform]. Gardening. X58—How to Make the Garden Pay. back of hoe. A few radish seeds might also be scattered along the rows with the beet seed. The radishes will better indicate the rows, so that we can begin to cultivate a few days after sow- ing. The radishes may be pulled up when of table or market- able size. Cultivation.—Prompt action is the all important point. Weeds should never be allowed to crowd. Cultivate with a narrow-bladed horse-hoe or cultivator; hoe as often as needed, and while the plants are young, run the hand wheel-hoe astraddle the rows, to keep them as near as possible free from weeds with- out much hand hoeing or hand weeding. Thinning should be attended to before the plants begin to crowd one another. Most of this work can be done with a hoe, and since we desire but one good plant to lo or 12 inches of drill, we can easily strike out the plants and weeds growing on the spaces between. Of course there may be a num- ber of plants left on each clump near the plant we wish to save, especially where the seed was sowed like corn (in pinches). We then have to pull up the surplus plants by hand. Gathering and Storing.— Thorough cultivation and timely attention on good and well- manured land is pretty apt to bring a crop that will astonish the novice, as a yield of 40, 60, and even more tons to the acre is not uncommon under favor- able circumstances. Before frost, in autumn, the beets are pulled by hand and thrown in heaps to be topped {i. ^., foliage cut off with a sickle or corn cutter) and drawn to the cellar or pit. The best storage place, undoubtedly, is a reg- ular root cellar in the basement of the barn. A separate root or potato cellar, such as a dug-out in a hill-side, or the root cellar described for the winter storage of celery, also makes a very good place for beets, carrots, etc., to be fed out during winter and spring. If we have neither of these conveniences, we must store what we want to use durin