. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE SHIPWORM. 107 appendages, passing rapidly through the water. It does not, however, retain this form for more than six and thirty hours, but undergoes a further process of development, and is then fur- nished with a distinct apparatus for swimming and crawling. It also possesses rudimentary eyes, and in that portion of the body which may be considered the head, there are organs of hearing resembling those of certain molluscs. When it has passed its full

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. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE SHIPWORM. 107 appendages, passing rapidly through the water. It does not, however, retain this form for more than six and thirty hours, but undergoes a further process of development, and is then fur- nished with a distinct apparatus for swimming and crawling. It also possesses rudimentary eyes, and in that portion of the body which may be considered the head, there are organs of hearing resembling those of certain molluscs. When it has passed its full
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Image ID: PG2G2F
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE SHIPWORM. 107 appendages, passing rapidly through the water. It does not, however, retain this form for more than six and thirty hours, but undergoes a further process of development, and is then fur- nished with a distinct apparatus for swimming and crawling. It also possesses rudimentary eyes, and in that portion of the body which may be considered the head, there are organs of hearing resembling those of certain molluscs. When it has passed its full time in this stage of development, it fixes upon some favourable locality, and then undergoes its last change, which transforms it into the worm-like mollusc with which naturalists are so familiar.. SHIPVVURM The ravages committed by this creature are almost incredible. Wood of every description is devoured by the Shipworm, whose tunnels are frequently placed so closely together that the parti- tion between them is not thicker than the paper on which this account is printed. As the Teredo bores, it lines the tunnel with a thin shell of calcareous matter, thus presenting a remarkable resemblance to the habits of the white ant. When the Teredos have taken entire possession of a piece of timber, they destroy it so completely, that if the shelly lining were removed from the wood, and each weighed separately, the mineral substance would equal the vegetable in weight. The Shipworm has been the cause of numerous wrecks, for it. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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