. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE POLAR BEAK. 55 # â vV 'â f ,|i|JJ- . â ' ' ,; i(n I '''' !â â ⢠';«â¢:â â 'â â .', .,. The Polai- Bear. finds himself in such a position, and knows how to avail him- self of the means around him, will welcome every flake that falls, and instead of looking upon the snow as an enemy whose white arms are ready to inclose him in a fatal embrace, he hails the soft masses as a means of affording him warmth and safety. Choosing some spot where the snow lies

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. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE POLAR BEAK. 55 # â vV 'â f ,|i|JJ- . â ' ' ,; i(n I '''' !â â ⢠';«â¢:â â 'â â .', .,. The Polai- Bear. finds himself in such a position, and knows how to avail him- self of the means around him, will welcome every flake that falls, and instead of looking upon the snow as an enemy whose white arms are ready to inclose him in a fatal embrace, he hails the soft masses as a means of affording him warmth and safety. Choosing some spot where the snow lies
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Image ID: PFYH1P
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE POLAR BEAK. 55 # â vV 'â f ,|i|JJ- . â ' ' ,; i(n I '''' !â â ⢠';«â¢:â â 'â â .', .,. The Polai- Bear. finds himself in such a position, and knows how to avail him- self of the means around him, will welcome every flake that falls, and instead of looking upon the snow as an enemy whose white arms are ready to inclose him in a fatal embrace, he hails the soft masses as a means of affording him warmth and safety. Choosing some spot where the snow lies deepest, such as the side of a bank or a tree, or a large stone, he scoops out with his hands a hollow in which he can lie, and â¢Wherein he is sheltered from the freezing blasts that scud over the land. Wrapping himself in his garments, he burrows his way as deeply as he can, and then lies quietly, allowing the snow to fall upon him unheeded. The extemporized cell in which he reclines soon begins to show its virtues. The substance in which it is hol- lowed is a very imperfect conductor of heat, so that the traveler. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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