. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE I'lCmCIAGO, 41 imagined, its subterraDcau habits and timid nature seldom per- mitting it to be seen. Like the mole, it lives beneath the earth, scooping out long galleries in the soil, and probably feeding upon insects, worms, and grubs like the rest of the edentate animals.. PICHICIAOO The chief point of interest which strikes an observer when looking at a Pichiciago, is the cuirass with which its body is defended. It is made and arranged in a very pec

- Image ID: RDF5K9
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE I'lCmCIAGO, 41 imagined, its subterraDcau habits and timid nature seldom per- mitting it to be seen. Like the mole, it lives beneath the earth, scooping out long galleries in the soil, and probably feeding upon insects, worms, and grubs like the rest of the edentate animals.. PICHICIAOO The chief point of interest which strikes an observer when looking at a Pichiciago, is the cuirass with which its body is defended. It is made and arranged in a very pec
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Image ID: RDF5K9
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE I'lCmCIAGO, 41 imagined, its subterraDcau habits and timid nature seldom per- mitting it to be seen. Like the mole, it lives beneath the earth, scooping out long galleries in the soil, and probably feeding upon insects, worms, and grubs like the rest of the edentate animals.. PICHICIAOO The chief point of interest which strikes an observer when looking at a Pichiciago, is the cuirass with which its body is defended. It is made and arranged in a very peculiar manner. The cuirass looks as if a number of squared plates of horn had been sewn upon short lengths of tape, and then the tape bands laid side by side and fastened to each other. It is not fixed to the animal throughout its whole extent, as might be supposed, but is only attached along the spine, and on the top of the head. It does not merely protect the back, but when it reaches the inser- tion of the tail, turns suddenly downwards as if on hinges, and forms a kind of flap over the hind-quarters, which are short and square, as if abruptly cut off b)' a perpendicular blow with a sharp instrument. This arrangement affords a perfect protec- tion to tlie hind-ijunrters vliile the animal is liTiirow ini:. and. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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