. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE HIVE-BEE. 431 lozenge-shaped figure which has just been described, let, him draw upon cardboard nine of them, as is shown in the illustration (fig. 4.) Then let him cut out the figure, and draw his penknife half through the cardboard at all the lines of junction. He will then find that the cardboard will fold into an exact model of a bee-cell, the three lozenges which project from the sides forming the base, and the others the sides. This cell will, of

- Image ID: RDFFHK
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDFFHK
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. THE HIVE-BEE. 431 lozenge-shaped figure which has just been described, let, him draw upon cardboard nine of them, as is shown in the illustration (fig. 4.) Then let him cut out the figure, and draw his penknife half through the cardboard at all the lines of junction. He will then find that the cardboard will fold into an exact model of a bee-cell, the three lozenges which project from the sides forming the base, and the others the sides. This cell will, of course, have very short sides; but by the simple expedient of wideiung the lozenges, which form the sides, without altering the angles, the imitation cell can be made of any desired length.. The best way of showing this beautiful structure is to make two models, one to lie flat or be folded and opened at discre- tion, and the other formed into a cell, and the angles written upon the cardboard. A little gummed paper will hold the sides together, so that the model can be handled vrithout breaking. A very amusing puzzle may be formed by cutting oat the nine lozenge-shaped pieces of cardboard, and by requesting that they be so put together as to form the model of a bee-cell. We have not yet exhausted the wonders of the bee-comb. If we take a piece of comb from which all the cells have been removed, and hold it up to the light, we shall see that the cells are not placed opposite each other, but that the three lozenges which form the base of one cell form part of the base of three. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

Similar stock images