. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE DUCKBILL. 67 which it derives its name. Others call it the Water Mole, on account of its aquatic habits and mole-like fur. Some scientific naturalists have called it the OrnUhorhynchus â paradoxus; others have given it the name of Platypy^ anatinus âthe former title being to my mitfd by far the more appropriate and expressive of. the two. The natives of Australia have sev- eral na,mes for this remarkable animal; some calling it Mallan- gong, others Tamb

- Image ID: RDAEYD
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE DUCKBILL. 67 which it derives its name. Others call it the Water Mole, on account of its aquatic habits and mole-like fur. Some scientific naturalists have called it the OrnUhorhynchus â paradoxus; others have given it the name of Platypy^ anatinus âthe former title being to my mitfd by far the more appropriate and expressive of. the two. The natives of Australia have sev- eral na,mes for this remarkable animal; some calling it Mallan- gong, others Tamb
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Image ID: RDAEYD
. Homes without hands : being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction . Animals. THE DUCKBILL. 67 which it derives its name. Others call it the Water Mole, on account of its aquatic habits and mole-like fur. Some scientific naturalists have called it the OrnUhorhynchus â paradoxus; others have given it the name of Platypy^ anatinus âthe former title being to my mitfd by far the more appropriate and expressive of. the two. The natives of Australia have sev- eral na,mes for this remarkable animal; some calling it Mallan- gong, others Tambreet, and others Tohunbuckâthe second of these titles being most generally in use. ./ i. Mallangong or DuckbilL Until Dr. Bennett prosecuted his well-known researches in Australia, no European knew precisely whether the Duckbill was a burrower, or, indeed, whether it had a home of any kind. The natives were well aware of the fact that the animal dug tunnels into the ground, and showed great address in discover- ing the burrows and unearthing the inmates. There, however, their knowledge seemed to end. The only value of an animal to a native Australian is its capability of being eaten, and the only lore which an Australian troubles himself to acquire is the knowledge of the habits of the animal with reference to catching. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). New York : Harper & Brothers

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