. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. HONEY-MAKING WASl'S. 2G3 was an account, of certain wasps which made honey. Some per- sons said that the whole statement was a fabrication, and others remarked that the honey-making insects weie simply bees which De Azara had erroneously considered to be wasps. Time, how- ever, had its usual effect, and De Azara has been proved to be perfectly trustworthy in his remarks. The two specimens which are represented in the illustration are now in the British Muse

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. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. HONEY-MAKING WASl'S. 2G3 was an account, of certain wasps which made honey. Some per- sons said that the whole statement was a fabrication, and others remarked that the honey-making insects weie simply bees which De Azara had erroneously considered to be wasps. Time, how- ever, had its usual effect, and De Azara has been proved to be perfectly trustworthy in his remarks. The two specimens which are represented in the illustration are now in the British Muse
The Book Worm / Alamy Stock Photo
Image ID: RDFG0N
. Homes without hands. : Being a description of the habitations of animals, classed according to their principle of construction. Animals. HONEY-MAKING WASl'S. 2G3 was an account, of certain wasps which made honey. Some per- sons said that the whole statement was a fabrication, and others remarked that the honey-making insects weie simply bees which De Azara had erroneously considered to be wasps. Time, how- ever, had its usual effect, and De Azara has been proved to be perfectly trustworthy in his remarks. The two specimens which are represented in the illustration are now in the British Museum, and afford tangible proofs that De Azara was right and his detractors wrong.. xEcrARrsiA, HYBAtETlL^, The right-hand figure represents the nest of a curious insect, named by Mr. Adam White Myrapdra scutellaris. The generic title is not very appropriate, being simply a fanciful name, com- posed of the names of two ancient cities, one called Myra, in Lycia, and the other Petra, the capital town of Arabia Petrsea.. Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.. Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889; Keyl, Friedrich Wilhelm, 1823-1871; Smith, E. A. (Edward Alfred); Pearson, G. (George). London : Longmans, Green, and Co.

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